This site is closed to new comments and posts.

Notice: This site uses cookies to function.
If you are not comfortable with cookies then please don't browse this website.

Prospective Park Place Pawnshop! - Near Franklin Avenue. — Brooklynian

Prospective Park Place Pawnshop! - Near Franklin Avenue.

There is ongoing illegal construction occurring at 641-711 Franklin Avenue (on Park Place near Franklin Avenue) within the same building where the laundromat currently resides. On top of the building is a sign indicating that there will be a pawn shop in the same building. The sign states that pawn shop will buy jewelry, as well as electronics.

The Crow Hill Community Association has issued a petition to stop the construction, as there is fear that the pawn shop will foment even more criminal behavior in the community, and be seen as a space where those who steal can bring the products of their crimes to be redeemed. As I write this, there is a protest at the corner of Franklin Avenue and Park Place occurring.

The men doing the construction were asked about the work and they initially told people that they were building a lawyer's office, but after being asked about the pawn shop sign located on top of the laundromat, they feigned that they did not understand what was being said, as they do not speak English. Also, there are no signs indicating that they have the right to do construction.
«13456717

Comments

  • wow -- thanks for posting this. Is there a petition for signatures? Is it online? Or where can I find it? I live at that intersection and agree with CHCA's stance completely.
  • The petition is not yet online. There are people at the corner of Franklin and Park Place collecting signatures right now. The online facsimile is to follow.
  • What other steps have been taken to halt this undesired entity?
  • Although this might seem like a good idea, Pawn shops are perfectly legal and only require a license from Consumer Affairs to operate. I don't know where or to whom this petition would go.
  • as long as load bearing walls are not being torn down and no electrical or plumbing is being moved you dont need a permit to do work on your house
  • There is no disputing the legality of having a pawn shop. The consternation about it is based on the presumption that a pawnshop in this area will attract a criminal element, and be the latent incentive for more crime.

    There was an impromptu demonstration in front of the prospective site which was quickly quelled by police officers on patrol. The demonstrators had no permit, and though sympathetic to their cause, the police stated that there could be no demonstration without the appropriate permit. In conversation with them, they made explicit references to pawn shops that exist somewhere on Nostrand Avenue, and the criminal element it attracts. One officer made reference to growing up with a pawnshop near his own home, and essentially seeing the neighborhood thieves steal from people, then send in their lackeys to make the exchange for cash in the pawnshop.

    I am no unbiased party here. I do not think the prospect of such an establishment will increase the quality of life in this community. I see this type of business as a subtle incentive for some thieves to break into homes, steal merchandise and sell it conveniently. I used to live near a pawnshop, and it always attracted a questionable element. In addition, the pawnshop will be literally feet away from a methadone clinic, where alcoholics and drug addicts come for counseling and medication. It seems to me the addition of a pawnshop is a variable that will be more a catalyst for crime rather than to mitigate it.

    There are certain criteria a pawnshop owner must follow -- insurance obligations, as well as distance requirements from churches and schools. It is my understanding that the Crow Hill Community Association is looking into whether the proprietor satisfies those criteria.

    Widespread awareness of the pawnshop became known at yesterday's CHCA meeting held at Launch Pad on Franklin Avenue. The actions taken today were made in response.

    It is my understanding that there will be an online petition available at the Crow Hill Community Association website. A paper petition was just made today. In the interim, those who are concerned can call 311 and protest the fact that there is illegal construction occurring; they have no permission to do the construction. Also, we can all alert Leticia James' office. I don't have her contact number handy, but I do believe it is on the 'tree branch breaker' thread.
  • Seems like this is an issue that Tish James could help us address, especially if some law is being violated in the construction of this pawn shop. Here is her email address: LJames@council.nyc.gov. I urge people to contact her; she is very responsive.
  • I agree that a Pawn shop does little to serve the Community and most defenitely attracts a criminal element. I just think its very difficult to prevent a store from opening a legal business. Also there are many Pawn shops in the area already disguised as electronic shops, bodegasd etc. Most of these places cant survive on pawning alone so their stores are often divided to sell other merchandise. You also have second hand jewelery stores all over the place, ever notice the We Buy Gold signs? Those stores also attract a criminal element.
  • I guess the new proprietor believes the present criminals are underserved by the businesses available.
  • This just appears to be an advertisement. What's wrong with that?
  • This just appears to be an advertisement. What's wrong with that?
    nothing. MHA is just being a busybody, as per usual.
  • Why dont we boycott the bodegas, they probably facilitate criminal activity more then pawn shops?
  • The advertisement atop the laundromat advertises that the pawnshop will be located in the same vicinity as laundromat. The door to the pawnshop is slated to be on Park Place. Can you imagine doing your laundry, your kids in tow and some dude walks in with a gold chain wanting to fence it?

    KWAC, I agree with you, but as of yet, there are no 'We buy gold' signs on that side of Franklin Avenue. I share your sentiment about the difficulty of closing a legal business. I don't think that there is much a protest can do to stop that. It is my hope however, that a petition raises public scrutiny to ensure that the proprietor is following the protocol necessary to open such a business. If our elected and appointed officials are made aware of the community's distaste for such an enterprise, maybe they will ensure to regulate it more closely than they normally would.

    Regarding boycotting bodegas, I for one do not go to certain bodegas because of what occurs in them, so yes, why don't we boycott any business establishment that we believe diminishes the quality of our lives?
  • MHA wrote: Regarding boycotting bodegas, I for one do not go to certain bodegas because of what occurs in them, so yes, why don't we boycott any business establishment that we believe diminishes the quality of our lives?
    Because it would infringe on a citizen's inalienable rights to say, open up a bulletproof liquior store. To own and operate any legal small business, really. It is the American Dream, after all, isn't it?

    A liquor store in of itself is nothing to worry about per se, but if its a liquor store, or a bodega, or any local establishment that may or may not cater to patrons who participate in illegal activity, your point seems indicate that it should be protested, permits shouldn't be issued, etc.

    I do actually agree that a pawn shop is likely not the best fit for this area, but really, where is the line drawn? Do we protest the 24-hour chicken place, because corner dealers may decide to get some wings at 3:am? Subways run 24/7 in this town, I bet certain types of miscreants make use of it. Let's boycott subways as well.
  • Alright then stfool. You have your opinion, I have mine. God bless America.

    I started the thread to alert individuals about the plans to build a pawnshop, and we have gone way off topic to bodegas, liquor stores and now fried chicken! LOL. Unlike so many people here I don't just talk the talk. If you have no qualms about the pawn shop, if you don't want to do anything about it, then fine, that is your right.

    In many ways, the establishment of yet another pawn shop in Brooklyn is no different than the attempt at establishing the Islamic center at the WTC site. Both parties have the inalienable right to do it. As a resident of THIS community, I am very concerned about the collateral affect of such an establishment. The question remains, how will this affect the area in which it will exist?
  • In NY State, pawn shops are allowed to charge customers 4% PER MONTH on fully secured loans (48% APR, before compounding, which I'm too lazy to do).That is reason enough to not want a pawn shop for Franklin Ave.
  • MHA wrote:
    I started the thread to alert individuals about the plans to build a pawnshop, and we have gone way off topic to bodegas, liquor stores and now fried chicken! LOL. Unlike so many people here I don't just talk the talk. If you have no qualms about the pawn shop, if you don't want to do anything about it, then fine, that is your right.
    C'mon, man. My post is in no way about "fried chicken". I was simply illustrating my point. I don't see how that's off-topic at all.

    But hey, I see your point about how a pawn shop is not a good fit for this neighborhood, respect that opinion, and even (as previously stated) agree with you. We only seem to disagree on an idea I mentioned - that I don't believe someone, anyone, should be prevented from opening a completely legal business just because some local residents don't like the idea of said business in their neighborhood. Which makes protesting its opening not only a-okay in my book but a completely legitimate response.

    The thread just lost me on the idea of getting local council people to somehow prevent permits from being issued. Seems like dirty pool.
  • ntfool wrote: [quote=MHA]Regarding boycotting bodegas, I for one do not go to certain bodegas because of what occurs in them, so yes, why don't we boycott any business establishment that we believe diminishes the quality of our lives?
    Because it would infringe on a citizen's inalienable rights to say, open up a bulletproof liquior store. To own and operate any legal small business, really. It is the American Dream, after all, isn't it?

    A liquor store in of itself is nothing to worry about per se, but if its a liquor store, or a bodega, or any local establishment that may or may not cater to patrons who participate in illegal activity, your point seems indicate that it should be protested, permits shouldn't be issued, etc.

    MHA could be talking about the bodegas that engage in illegal activity, which several on Franklin do. It's not really about catering to patrons who engage in illegal activity. They have just as much right to use services, just as owners have a right to sell to them.
  • I don't think I have the right to prevent anyone from operating any business they might want to. However, I think that it is in our benefit to ensure that the proprietors of this establishment are adhering to the letter of the law; that evidence of them wanting to operate a business responsibly is if they are adhering to the prerequisites of running a pawnshop -- i.e. insurance, for once thing, to cover the potential theft of goods, distance from schools and churches as well.

    The reason public policy has determined that these prerequisites are met is to ensure that the integrity (and marketability) of a neighborhood is maintained. I do not own property in this neighborhood. If I did, I would be extremely concerned about the prospect of a 24 hour chicken shack, a bar, or even a grocery store that sells it's wares on the sidewalk. I hold my concern because I know what element pawn shops attract. It isn't pleasant.

    Countering an argument that Whynot_31 established in another thread, I am confident that there is a market for what a pawn shop will sell, and buy; however, just because there is a market for ANY good, that alone does not deem it a social good; and ergo my argument against the legalization of drugs. What has to be taken into our consideration is that there are collateral effects associated with all private enterprise, some negative, and some positive. What are the collateral effects of bars? Of garages? Of pawn shops? Of 24 hour chicken shacks?

    Where this thread is devolving is to an argument that 'MHA wants to stop private enterprise', and again, that is not what I am arguing here. I ask all who are concerned about the potential negative collateral effects of this pawn shop being on Park Place to please send Ms. James an email, or contact the CHCA for more information.
  • MHA wrote: I don't think I have the right to prevent anyone from operating any business they might want to. However, I think that it is in our benefit to ensure that the proprietors of this establishment are adhering to the letter of the law; that evidence of them wanting to operate a business responsibly is if they are adhering to the prerequisites of running a pawnshop -- i.e. insurance, for once thing, to cover the potential theft of goods, distance from schools and churches as well.
    As stated previously, I agree with your sentiment. I simply stated that the thread (notice I pointed out that it was the "thread", not "MHA") encouraging readers to get in touch with Letisha James to shut the place down seemed extreme to me. By all means, shut the place down if it is operating illegally. But not because it doesn't fit some neighborhood residents' idea of social acceptabililty.
    MHA wrote: Where this thread is devolving is to an argument that 'MHA wants to stop private enterprise', and again, that is not what I am arguing here.
    In fact, neither was I. Again, I was pretty clear that it was a suggestion of the thread overall, not you. In fact, I was very careful to specify as such. Don't knee-jerk me man, I thought we were having a somewhat lively conversation. Don't play the victim when there's no need.
  • The important queston to ask is: When will someone open a strip club on Franklin Avenue? The dearth of places to get a lap dance in this neighborhood is downright sinful.
  • Forgive my jerky knees. I'm used to a different type of conversation Ntfool...
  • No worries, all good.
  • Interestingly, the laundromat now has a sign in their window decrying any and all affiliation with the pawn shop. I'm sure they're worried about the backlash.

    I urge everyone to stop by launchpad and sign the petition, I think it's well worth it if only to voice your displeasure with the addition of something like this to our neighborhood.
  • As distasteful as I find the potential addition of a pawn shop, there's a treasure trove of good naming options for a combination laundromat/pawn shop.

    The obvious, of course - Money Laundry.

    But also:
    Pawned 'n Laun'd
    Fold 'n Sold
    Gold 'n Fold
    Ring Around the Dollar
  • The why nots add:
    Pay Dirt
    Agitate Le$$
    Skid Mark$
    Clean Cash
    Perspiration & desperation
    Mean Clean
    Sticky Fingers
    Tide and Tickets
    Gilt-be-Gone
    Worth for Dirt
  • Arches, you are so correct.

    Thankfully I paid attention in college marketing class, where I learned that no business name is complete without a good tag line..... Here are some ideas for this new enterprise:

    "We help with unpleasant stains and ill gotten gains"

    "we got all the Gain you need"
    image

    image


    "For the Jonesing Domestic"

    "Clean and Fiend in One Location!"

    "We'll make your brown skid marks AND gold rings disappear"

    "Got Crack Damage? We can help with both kinds"

    "Bring us your dirty socks and dirty hawks"



    And, finally, pawn shop jokes:
    Did you hear about the pig who opened a pawn shop? He called it "Ham Hocks".

    image
  • I can't help but see parallels between the prospective pawn shop and the prospective Islamic center. The arguments against both are quite similar, i.e. the sense of insult that many have about it -- that it is in poor taste to put a pawnshop on a brownstone-lined residential block, the worry about how it will affect the neighborhood, and the resultant desire to find some way of ensuring that it will not exist.

    I will write further about this on the other thread, as it seems appropriate to put it there. I am wondering, however, if others agree with me about the similarity ( or disagree), and I wonder if they can state why (or why not).
  • There seems to be a lot of pawn shops around. I have a hard time believing they cause instant doom.

    http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&q=pawn+shop+11238&fb=1&gl=us&hq=pawn+shop&hnear=Brooklyn,+Kings,+New+York+11238&ei=j_OgTMblMcKB8gbKnNF1&ved=0CCEQtgMwAA&sll=40.685612,-73.960724&sspn=0.085044,0.083381&start=30&t=h&z=11

    I will, however, admit that my favorite name and tagline:

    Perspiration & Desperation
    "Got Crack Damage? We can help with both kinds"


    may offend some.
  • Please do sign the petition that is at various establishments on Franklin Ave. including HAD Assoc. & LaunchPad both between Park Place & Sterling.

    We will be holding a protest/press rally and are working with Councilmember James & the 77th Precinct to set this up. Please do let Councilmember James know how you feel.

    We are in the process of fact finding about what possible legal recourse the community might have in opposing the pawn shop and will be developing a strategy accordingly.

    It is our understanding, based on information from the pawn shop owner (who has repeatedly lied to the community so take it with a grain of salt), that nothing will be for sale at this location. goods are taken in, cash is dispensed, interest is charged. unclaimed items go up on ebay except for gold which is melted down and sold.

    @MHA
    It is poor taste and potentially dangerous to put a pawn shop in any residential area (not only a brownstone tree lined block).

    it is also a slap in the face to a community that is struggling with criminal street activity, burglaries have been on the rise in the 77th Precinct, especially the west end.

    The landlord also tried to put a liquor store where the Chinese restaurant used to be, right next to the alcohol/drug rehab center!!! A pawn shop is not much of a better choice

    With respect to the comparison to the Islamic Cultural Center, while in both instances the opposition might be fear based, in the case of the pawn shop the fear is grounded in the direct effect its activities will have on the community as opposed to xenophobia.
    While there are clearly things that the Islamic Center might bring to lower Manhattan, we are hard pressed to find ANY advantages in bringing a pawn shop to Franklin Avenue.

    We will update you all further as things develop, please email us if you would like to help organize or get petitions signed chca@crowhillcommunity.org