SPLIT TOPIC: American society: the poor the unemployed - Page 4 — Brooklynian

SPLIT TOPIC: American society: the poor the unemployed

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Comments

  • Nope, in any given person's situation I never stated or implied it was entirely the rich's fault.

    I Never absolved individuals of their responsibility. In fact I've repeatedly stated the opposite.

    Like most people with blind faith in The American Dream, you resort to extremes and mischaracterizations as soon as someone questions the status quo.

    You fail to recognize power and privilege, and what it means for how our society is structured.

  • So because I don't agree that power and privilege are the driving forces behind the changing tides of the American landscape, I don't recognize them?

    No, I don't recognize them as you do. That doesn't mean I fail to recognize those factors as part of the problem- I've repeatedly pointed out how they work in with everything else. You continually dismiss factors that don't tie into power/privilege and then write off anyone who doesn't see things as such as "blinded by their privilege". Well you are blinded by your bias.

    Yes, many executives are grossly overpaid. Yes, there is a growing income gap that is a serious problem. No, "raising the poverty line", arbitrarily redistributing income or taxing the top 50% earners at 100% over $50K/year will not solve the complex issue of poverty and unemployment in America. If you want to hear why, I'll be glad to oblige.

  • homeowner said:

    Whynot, this one's for you.

    Yes, it is important to realize on how many levels we are screwed, and not just focus on one.

    Then it is important to enjoy life anyway, because there was never a time that we (as humans) were not screwed. I actually think this is a good time to be alive.

    For some reason I've been hearing this song in my head a lot lately.

    (for best results, skip to when the lyrics begin, about 1/3 into the video.)

  • Hopefully we can rekapture the people's republik through an uprising! May the blood of all Goldman Sachs employees wash over the streets!

  • It wouldn't be much of a loss to society if it happened. They're parasites, feeding off the rest of us.

  • I saw a wagon train of the filthy rich heading across the Verrazano Bridge to a new homestead on Staten Island.

  • booklaw said:

    It wouldn't be much of a loss to society if it happened. They're parasites, feeding off the rest of us.

    Strange; the same could be blindly said about (...), but such statements only provoke class based rage. Funny how this double standard thing works

  • Happy Friday!

    Today's blogging is brought to you by the words

    Interconnectivity

    and

    interdependence

  • "I saw a wagon train of the filthy rich heading across the Verrazano Bridge to a new homestead on Staten Island" -

    Bwah-ha-ha-ha-HAH! Oh to be king despot of the garbage pile! To rub elbows with such luminaries as The Sitch. To debate philosophy with the erudite mall crawlers - ah Utopia awaits a mere $10 and ten miles away. NOT.

  • Cool The Kid said:

    Strange; the same could be blindly said about (...), but such statements only provoke class based rage. Funny how this double standard thing works

    I can't speak for booklaw, but I'll gladly make this claim about the finance industry and not do it blindly in any way.

    Happy to discuss, just ask.

    On a related note, CTK, this one is for you.

  • Boygabriel said:

    I can't speak for booklaw, but I'll gladly make this claim about the finance industry and not do it blindly in any way.

    I could do the same about the (...), w/personal anecdotes, statistics, w/e, but I would be written off as "blinded by privilege" and being on the "wrong side of the class war". Again, I just think it's funny how the double standard works.


    On a related note, CTK, this one is for you.

    THE REVOLUNIEK APPROAKCHES

    This talk of the top 1% is eerily similar to the Islamic extremist rhetoric about Americans. Everyone is so focused on the wrong things, and much of the rage is based on either misinformation, stereotypes, the twisting/misunderstanding of facts, or outright lies. If you guys get to bathe in the blood of "the elite" as you dream to, w/o having made any efforts to elevate America's labor pool in competitiveness and technical competency, we will have made a grave mistake and will swiftly enter the third world.

    You are focusing on the wrong issues.

  • I could do the same about the (...), w/personal anecdotes, statistics, w/e, but I would be written off as "blinded by privilege" and being on the "wrong side of the class war". Again, I just think it's funny how the double standard works.

    Nah.

    I tend to discuss with people here, yourself included when you bother to try, on the merits of ideas and opinions.

    Again, I'm happy to discuss the value of the financial services industry.



    This talk of the top 1% is eerily similar to the Islamic extremist rhetoric about Americans. Everyone is so focused on the wrong things, and much of the rage is based on either misinformation, stereotypes, the twisting/misunderstanding of facts, or outright lies. If you guys get to bathe in the blood of "the elite" as you dream to, w/o having made any efforts to elevate America's labor pool in competitiveness and technical competency, we will have made a grave mistake and will swiftly enter the third world.

    It's easy to dismiss my arguments or that article when you don't actually respond to any points and ignore the entire thing.

    If you can't be bothered to do so, spare me your comparisons to islamic extremists. It's too early in the morning for comedy like that.

  • The article is to a large degree a parroting of the points you've been making for the last 13 pages. There are so many holes in it I don't even know where to start. And many of them are points I addressed already.

    America’s inequality distorts our society in every conceivable way. There is, for one thing, a well-documented lifestyle effect—people outside the top 1 percent increasingly live beyond their means. Trickle-down economics may be a chimera, but trickle-down behaviorism is very real.

    Yep, like I said, Americans living beyond their means is the fault of the top 1%... I can't roll my eyes hard enough

    The more divided a society becomes in terms of wealth, the more reluctant the wealthy become to spend money on common needs.

    Never mind the fact that the wealthy pay far more than they make proportionally in taxes, and no matter how much the gov't collects, somehow it's "never enough"

    Etc etc... the article is a crock of shit, to be frank, saying nothing new and bringing up many bogus points I addressed pages/months ago, also like you not addressing the causes of this problem outside of it being a conscious effort from those who benefit. I'm tired, let me know when you have something new to say.

  • They're not holes. They're just things you don't agree with.

    I think that nobel prize winning economist is summarizing a lot of data about how skewed our society is.

    For me personally the biggest problem is that the other 99% of us accept all of this simply b/c it's the status quo.

    As you've said throughout this thread, tackling poverty is complicated and difficult and involves far more than economics, I agree strongly.

    That is not, however, why I think Stiglitz article is valuable. It distills the many societal and structural things wrong with our economy, our laws, and our tax code.

  • Posting this article now is like me raising the point that one size fits all will not work to solve NYC's parking problems now. We cleared that understanding hurdle pages/months ago.

    The tax "problem" was also debunked several pages ago (curve of tax progression is exponential when combined with income, the rallying for more taxes on the rich when 1/2 the population pays no income tax is, at my nicest, incredibly hypocritical/short sighted)

    And they are indeed holes. Blaming Bill Gates for buying shit you can't afford and didn't need in the first place is ridiculous. Dude cries about the rich's share of income and tax rates but quite conspicuously makes no mention of what portion of taxes the rich pay. Like I said, the whole article is shit, your viewpoint enables you to overlook the glaring + obvious fallacies presented.

    Let me say now (again for some statements) I think trickle down theory is bullshit, I think there is an income gap problem, and I think many Americans are getting/dropping back competitively in today's world, and the last statement is the real driver of the problem of the poor, unemployed and slipping middle class. I've heard your argument 1000 times and I think it's wrong + have stated why very clearly. Are you ready to hear mine?

This discussion has been closed.