Do cats have allergies? — Brooklynian

Do cats have allergies?

My cat has had watery eyes (well, one eye) for a few days. No goop or anything, just a clear liquid running from one eye, down her face, like tears.

Otherwise, she's behaving normally.

What could this be? Does it warrant a vet visit?

Comments

  • My friend treats her cats weeping eye with L-Lysine, you

    can check out the reviews for it on iherb.com

    I have started giving it to my dog but since we just

    started yesterday, I can't tell you much.

    It's a human supplement but so many that reviewed the

    product are using it on their cats. My dog is

    extremely allergy prone. It seems to have several uses

    and not expensive at all. All the best.

  • PS

    The L-Lysine is from the NOW company and the dose is

    500 mg.

    Thought that might be helpful so you can access the

    reviews that I read before I purchased, it is also

    the same that my friend uses on her cats.

  • Cats can and do have allergies, just like humans. Both my cats are asthmatic, but I find cleaning out their noses once in a while prevents asthma attacks. (I'm asthmatic as well and I'm allergic to every asthma medication out there. Blowing my nose regularly is key to prevention.) One of my cats gets her nose clogged pretty frequently, and I trained her to blow into a kleenex (obviously, I have to hold it up for her) because otherwise she blows out kitty snot everywhere. Yuck!

    And just like people can be allergic to cats, I think some cats can be allergic to people. I had a boyfriend my cat loved, but I swear they were allergic to each other. So he would hold him and they'd both start sneezing!

    The typical allergies cats seem to have are either to dust or certain pollens. I had a cat that turned out to be allergic to ragweed pollen, unbeknownst to us. He recovered from lymphoma only to die of an asthma attack caused by a high ragweed pollen count.

    Cats can have food allergies, but they manifest as skin problems usually and can only be diagnosed by a vet.

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