A Grilled Cheese restaurant for Lincoln and Franklin - Brooklynian

A Grilled Cheese restaurant for Lincoln and Franklin

For years, the NW corner of Lincoln and Franklin (aka 788 Franklin) was the site of open drug activity and violence that was pretty intense.

I moved to the area in 2003, and can attest it was violent between 2003 and 2009. Friends who lived in the area prior to 2003 have told me the corner had been the site of violence and drug dealing for literally decades beforehand.

In the summer of 2010, the activities in the immediate area began to be discussed here, on the Brooklynian website:

-Shootings.

-Police Raids.

-Open Drug dealing.

-Police "Impact Zone" observation towers.

-Police foot patrols.

http://www.brooklynian.com/forums/topic/732010-2-shootings-on-franklin-avenear-95-south

http://www.brooklynian.com/forums/topic/police-activity-at-bodega-on-lincoln-and-franklin

http://www.brooklynian.com/forums/topic/drug-spot-on-sterling-place

As the fall of 2010 arrived, the drug dealers seemed to become much more discreet. The business of selling easily concealed, quickly handed-off, thumb-size plastic bags seemed to be falling off.

During each season of 2011, I witnessed fewer and fewer transactions take place. Sales appeared to be on the decline.

During the Spring of 2012, the corner seemed to lose its reputation as a reliable place for strangers to score. What once had been a 24 hour open drug mart, now seemed to be changing.

Most of the time, the site began to host only deals that had been pre-arranged by phone. Customers without appointments began to be restricted to the hours of 1 AM - 5 AM.

Then, a few months ago, the 24 hour bodega that seemed to be the longtime base of the activity (788 Franklin) was struck by a medium size fire, and closed. The few sellers and buyers that remained instantly lost a key source of warmth, cover, cigarettes, and 40 oz beers. Presumably, they went to locations that were more reliable, and provided better accommodations.

Neighborhood residents (such as yours truly) watched with great interest. We predicted that the site would not be vacant for long and when it reopened, it would be different.

A few weeks ago, renovations began. Recently, I learned from a reliable source what it will become: A casual restaurant that specializes in Grilled Cheese Sandwiches.



Yum.

Comments

  • just walked by and the construction doors were open-- looked like a far-too-nice renovation for the same grimy bodega. interesting.

  • That food truck has a yummy menu: http://morrisgrilledcheese.com/?page_id=11

    and yummy photos:


  • Also whynot, thanks for the detailed history of that corner. Very interesting to see the change going on

  • Awesome! I just saw the work there today and wondered what it was going to be.

  • "south Prospect Heights". Nice.

  • This is my favorite transformation in a while. I congratulate everyone who patiently and cleverly worked hard to make this happen.

    ...you know who you are :)

  • i am jumping up and down for joy right now. in denver i used to have a specialty grilled cheese joint down the block from me and it was an awful awful delicious addiction. i am so excited for this potential upcoming relapse. thankfully its a bit farther away than my last score was so i aim to keep it in check. weeeeeeee!!!!!!!!!!!!!


  • I like that the corner will continue to serve its long term purpose:

    Feeding people's addictions.

  • P.S. The grubstreet link says we will get more than just grilled cheese sandwiches

    ....beer, wine, and sit down service could also happen.

  • whynot_31 said:

    That food truck has a yummy menu: http://morrisgrilledcheese.com/?page_id=11

    and yummy photos:


    Oh my god that looks so damn good.

    I want to say: "Congrat-ul-gentrification-s

    you now have a habitable nabe", but then I will get flamed by lowlife sympathizers who will whine about how gentrifiers push out poor and disenfranchised folks.

    I say: No one wants to live with lowlife drug dealers/users. They contribute nothing and take everything; quality of life, health , and happiness from a neighborhood.

    I am sure if it wasn't for greedy opportunistic landlords price gouging at the signs of gentrification, the poor "disenfranchised" would be just as happy that gentrifiers bring business, and safety and quality of life to most neighborhoods that were slowly languishing under the tyranny of gang and lowlife dominion.

    Okay folks FLAME AWAY

  • Who knew that all it took to make a neighborhood habitable was the presence of $10 grilled cheese sandwiches?

    I will get flamed by lowlife sympathizers who will whine about how gentrifiers push out poor and disenfranchised folks.

    I say: No one wants to live with lowlife drug dealers/users. They contribute nothing and take everything; quality of life, health , and happiness from a neighborhood.

    Not going to flame you but simply say that it's clear that the lowlife drug dealer/users have simply been replaced by drunken frat punks .

    And, many of the people complaining about the changes are not "disenfranchised" but are people with jobs and families that lived in these communities because they could afford them who now have fewer options for staying in the city. As a college student or young single post-grad, you can opt to split a two bedroom apartment with four adults all paying a share of the rent. As a parent of a family of four, you don't have such options and you live where you can afford. Those folks make too much to live in subsidized or public housing, but make too little to remain in this neighborhood post gentrification. Its also not clear to me what is being contributed to the neighborhood by a large group of the newcomers, other than the creation of a market for expensive sandwiches and craft beer.

    None of this is the fault of the grilled cheese folks, but it is sad that folks can't celebrate the coming of new things while at the same time recognize that their presence also signifies the loss of not just the "bad" elements of the neighborhood, but of another working class neighborhood in Brooklyn.

  • homeowner wrote: None of this is the fault of the grilled cheese folks, it is sad that folks can't celebrate the coming of new things while at the same time recognize that their presence also signifies the loss of not just the "bad" elements of the neighborhood, but of another working class neighborhood in Brooklyn.

    It is also tough to blame the neighborhood "activists".

    In this case, some neighborhood newbies and long term residents (representing lots of demographics and hues) were able agree on a common goal: "Get drug dealers out of that intersection".

    For some the agreement was tacitly reached, for others, it was explicit.

    Said "activists" then worked (at times) together and (at times) independently. A variety of methods were used to achieve the common goal.

    -Agreement on the methods was not always achieved, or even sought.

    -Agreement on allies (police, politicians, etc) was also not always achieved, or even sought. ...yet allies were involved in the effort.

    Despite this lack of coordination, as time progressed, the common goal was obtained.

    While I believe "we" certainly sped up the timeframe in which the common goal was achieved, in this case, I believe the goal would have been eventually obtained even without "our" efforts.

    Likewise, additional outcomes were obtained that were not understood or intended by all participants.

    For example, as a result of the perception of the area changing, many of those who have long resided "here" have had to move.

    It leads one to hypothesize that if a "west" Brooklyn neighborhood conquers street violence, it will quickly become more expensive.

    While seemingly valid, this line of thought could lead to several faulty hypotheses:

    -That all (or most) of those who have moved, were complicit in the neighborhood's prior reputation.

    and/or

    -That all (or most) of those who remain, were complicit in the neighborhood's prior reputation.

    and/or

    -That all of those who moved did so because they could not afford to stay.

    Folks are welcome to think about such things as they eat their grilled cheese sandwich, but if they choose to think about something else ...or nothing at all... that is ok too.

  • homeowner said:

    Who knew that all it took to make a neighborhood habitable was the presence of $10 grilled cheese sandwiches?

    I will get flamed by lowlife sympathizers who will whine about how gentrifiers push out poor and disenfranchised folks.I say: No one wants to live with lowlife drug dealers/users. They contribute nothing and take everything; quality of life, health , and happiness from a neighborhood.

    Not going to flame you but simply say that it's clear that the lowlife drug dealer/users have simply been replaced by drunken frat punks .

    And, many of the people complaining about the changes are not "disenfranchised" but are people with jobs and families that lived in these communities because they could afford them who now have fewer options for staying in the city. As a college student or young single post-grad, you can opt to split a two bedroom apartment with four adults all paying a share of the rent. As a parent of a family of four, you don't have such options and you live where you can afford. Those folks make too much to live in subsidized or public housing, but make too little to remain in this neighborhood post gentrification. Its also not clear to me what is being contributed to the neighborhood by a large group of the newcomers, other than the creation of a market for expensive sandwiches and craft beer.

    None of this is the fault of the grilled cheese folks, but it is sad that folks can't celebrate the coming of new things while at the same time recognize that their presence also signifies the loss of not just the "bad" elements of the neighborhood, but of another working class neighborhood in Brooklyn.

    Hmm. I didn't specifically mention the opening of the cheese shop, changed the neighborhood. I was replying to WhyNot's entire post, which chronicled the history of a block with bodegas that either explicitly or implicitly fostered drug/lowlife activity, and the change that has taken place.

    "And, many of the people complaining about the changes are not "disenfranchised" but are people with jobs and families that lived in these communities because they could afford them who now have fewer options for staying in the city."

    Somehow I don't believe you read THIS part of my post:

    I am sure if it wasn't for greedy opportunistic landlords price gouging at the signs of gentrification, the poor "disenfranchised" would be just as happy that gentrifiers bring business, and safety and quality of life to most neighborhoods that were slowly languishing under the tyranny of gang and lowlife dominion

    If you did, you would KNOW that I understood the real reason the "low income people" were complaining was because of the landlords taking advantage of the positive changes and NOT the positive changes themselves.

    Come on. Do you really think that anyone who works 20 hours a day, whether as a dish cleaner or lawyer, wants to come home to the same drug peddling, addicted asshats who crowd the entry ways of their buildings; blast music all night in the neighborhood; pee in the hallways; destroy property; and otherwise diminish any quality of life to be found in said nabs?

    Even when I was a broke ass student (and I'm still a sorta broke professional), nothing irked me more than busting my ass in the service industry all hours of the day then coming home to the same lazy, rude, assholes, who made the idea of rest, ordering food, or even opening your window to get a summer breeze IMPOSSIBLE.

    I have a janitor friend, who will be moving to SC, because he is tired of commuting to South Ozone Park after 12 hours of work, only to be unable to even get delivery of food, because the drug addled ass-hats and gang members in his community have robbed one too many of the delivery people.

    And don't get me started on all these "so called bodega's" that are really fronts for drugs. I am not saying that some aren't legitimate stores, but I am sure if you search this very site, you will know I am not the only one who has seen anecdotal evidence of Bodega/drug front activity.

  • whynot_31 said:

    Despite this lack of coordination, as time progressed, the common goal was obtained. While I believe "we" certainly sped up the timeframe in which the common goal was achieved, in this case, I believe the goal would have been eventually obtained even without "our" efforts.Likewise, additional outcomes were obtained that were not understood or intended by all participants.For example, as a result of the perception of the area changing, many of those who have long resided "here" have had to move. It leads one to hypothesize that if a "west" Brooklyn neighborhood conquers street violence, it will quickly become more expensive. While seemingly valid, this line of thought could lead to several faulty hypotheses:-That all (or most) of those who have moved, were complicit in the neighborhood's prior reputation.and/or-That all (or most) of those who remain, were complicit in the neighborhood's prior reputation.and/or-That all of those who moved did so because they could not afford to stay.Folks are welcome to think about such things as they eat their grilled cheese sandwich, but if they choose to think about something else ...or nothing at all... that is ok too.

    See, I love the way you think!

    This would be exactly my analysis, if I were:

    A) More intelligent and less passionate

    B)Paying more attention in my philosophy/logic classes

    C) More caffeinated.

    I am about the rectify the third issue.

  • The Psycho-ologist said:

    Oh my god that looks so damn good.

    I want to say: "Congrat-ul-gentrification-s

    you now have a habitable nabe", but then I will get flamed by lowlife sympathizers who will whine about how gentrifiers push out poor and disenfranchised folks.I say: No one wants to live with lowlife drug dealers/users. They contribute nothing and take everything; quality of life, health , and happiness from a neighborhood.I am sure if it wasn't for greedy opportunistic landlords price gouging at the signs of gentrification, the poor "disenfranchised" would be just as happy that gentrifiers bring business, and safety and quality of life to most neighborhoods that were slowly languishing under the tyranny of gang and lowlife dominion. Okay folks FLAME AWAY

    No flaming here. I agree with your comments but I am thinking that gouging is really the correct terminology. The forces of money in a society that has capitalism as its fundamental economic system favors price increases if a given market shifts. If you had 10 apartments to rent, how much would you ask for them? Would you take the most money you can possibly get? If not, why not and how would you make a business case to support your argument?

    If you look at it closely, you will see that the forces of supply and demand are not to be ignored.

  • If you did, you would KNOW that I understood the real reason the "low income people" were complaining was because of the landlords taking advantage of the positive changes and NOT the positive changes themselves.

    Come on. Do you really think that anyone who works 20 hours a day, whether as a dish cleaner or lawyer, wants to come home to the same drug peddling, addicted asshats who crowd the entry ways of their buildings; blast music all night in the neighborhood; pee in the hallways; destroy property; and otherwise diminish any quality of life to be found in said nabs?

    Even when I was a broke ass student (and I'm still a sorta broke professional), nothing irked me more than busting my ass in the service industry all hours of the day then coming home to the same lazy, rude, assholes, who made the idea of rest, ordering food, or even opening your window to get a summer breeze IMPOSSIBLE.

    I did read your entire post and what I was taking issue with was your use of quotes to describe those pushed out of the neighborhood as "disenfranchised" as if somehow this was some excuse those people had created for themselves to excuse their turning a blind eye to drug dealing that occurred in their neighborhood. In the same way that I'm uncomfortable with your designation of "the "low income people"". That's my particular tic, and I'm sorry if I mis-interpreted your intentions.

    I agree that people that work 20 hours a day don't want to come home to loud assholes taking liberties throughout the neighborhood that bring down the quality of life. Again, I just think that if you are describing the affects of gentrification as a positive because "those people" are no longer in the neighborhood, its important to note that those people include more people like your friend the janitor and fewer people like the bodega operators and the people backing them.

  • I haven't seen a post from catwalker in a while, but find this old one to be a spot on description of what is now gone:

    catwalkertexasranger said:

    788 deli on Franklin@Lincoln is way better. Drug dealers are not jumpie at all. Almost friendly and always comfortable. Divide their stash inside deli because of the owners friendly attitude and good lighting ensures no dropped rocks or buds. If you don't like nervous come to a relaxed comfortable showroom. No ID needed for a rapper or loosie. Never a parking problem because they lean in and complete the transaction with the car barely needing to come to a complete stop. Make sure to buy your food and drinks elsewhere because they don't carry regular deli items.

    I believe homeowner is pointing out that while gentrification is an effective tool against crime, it is not a very precise one.....

    I.E. As the neighborhood improves, the janitor who (tacitly or explicitly) worked toward the shared goal is told he must move to an area that lacks $9 grilled cheese sandwiches.

  • Update Jan 9, 2013:

    The proprietor, Michael Jacober, has stated to me that he hopes to open Glady's as early as Mid February.

  • spaceholder website created

    http://gladysnyc.com/

    Glady's Sandwich Shop

    This confirms that they applied for a Liquor, Beer and Wine lic: http://nyc.everyblock.com/liquor-licenses/sep11-application-gladys-5563578/

    ...I assume it was granted.

  • Ok people-

    It is now Feb 12, and I am getting hungry.

    Have any of you had the chance to look beyond the plywood and see how close this place is to being open?

  • Finally something other that a coffee shop lets see if it has a racially diverse costumer base.

  • I bet you it will serve to whoever likes grilled cheese sandwiches, and beer.

    ....and has the money for same.

    P.S. A friend peeked around the plywood this week. She said it is getting pretty close, but there is still carpentry equipment visible.

  • I'm sure they will serve anyone because money is still green but will this business attract a diverse base I will observe and if it does not I will wonder WHY?

  • I won't.

    I know that not everyone has the same amount of money, or the same opportunities to earn money, or the same desire to spend their money on grilled cheese sandwiches.

  • I wonder who those people u speak of tend to be ? That's really a hard question isn't it.

  • nope.

    Locally, many of them are already walking from where they live to Barbachino or Mayfield.

    ....on Vanderbilt Ave, they are eating at Beast and The Vanderbilt.

    See you there?

  • Nope Won't see me there not my cup of tea for my crew.

  • But maybe one day something will be developed for the crew oh reality check I doubt it .

  • Businesses rarely pursue diversity. They pursue customers with green.

    Some businesses pursue the poor: Fast food. Pawn shops. Check cashers.

    Many of them have left the neighborhood.

  • I wonder why they left?

  • I don't. ...There are fewer poor people here now.

  • U need to check out Lincoln place between Franklin and classon ave.

  • And what is poor to you? Because many new residents are doubling and tripling up to pay the rent, I would think if they had ample cash one person could pay the rent. Oh I'm probably just naive in my thinking oh well! I guess we are the new and improved park slope

  • Many neighborhoods followed the arc we seem to be presently on.

    This is not just a case of there being fewer low income people, but also a case of the new people being willing and able to spend more of their money on eating out.

    Some will split the rent by sharing apartments to accomplish it, others own brownstones.

    A lot goes into converting a drug corner to a grilled cheese sandwich restaurant.... It isn't all about carpentry.

  • Are we witnessing the latest incarnation of Annie Wilde? Or is it now a club with multiple members?

  • Back to the topic at hand.. I ate at their truck in midtown this week and the owner says they should be open on Franklin in two to three weeks. At first they will only be open for lunch.

  • Thanks dougallcurrie!

    Sounds like it will open in mid-March

  • Update March 20, 2013:

    I spoke with a worker today, and was able to get a quick look inside.

    The inside is looking almost complete, they used lots of tile on the walls and it is brightly lit. The plywood is still up because the storefront glass is not yet in place.

    The worker stated it would be two to three MORE weeks.

    So, despite the hopes of the owner and the guy in the truck, it looks like we are talking Mid April.

  • Yeah, I saw him this morning on my way to work unpacking bread from the truck (or maybe packing it into the truck). He told me the same. I didn't catch his name, but he seems like a nice guy. I'm really looking forward to this place.

    Side note: why does everything always have to devolve into a baseless, racially-motivated wankfest? We're talking about grilled cheese sandwiches for christ's sake. Pretty sure all of our mums made them for us when we were younglings.

  • Yeah, I saw him this morning on my way to work unpacking bread from the truck (or maybe packing it into the truck). He told me the same. I didn't catch his name, but he seems like a nice guy. I'm really looking forward to this place.

    Likewise. I don't need fancy food to make me happy.

  • chloeroyale said:

    I wonder who those people u speak of tend to be ? That's really a hard question isn't it.

    you are so coy -- i really have no idea what you're hinting at!

    i personally think that the grilled cheese is an inherently racist sandwich.

  • Last night someone inside told me they were opening today. I thought he was joking but when I left my house this morning the blockades were coming down. We'll see...!

  • A quick look at the facebook page for the truck and the Glady's websites indicates no info about when it will open.

    Maybe they are having a soft opening to get the kinks worked out before they make a big announcement about a grand opening?

  • just rode by and the panels, etc are coming down but def. doesn't look like it's ready to open.

    though-- progress!

    any word on the pizza/falafel/not-pizza-or-falafel/maybe-owned-by-myspace spots 1 block down?

  • I have no word on the Yogurt Place, or the Falafel place that will soon be opening on the block of Franklin between EP and Lincoln.

    I did however, snap this shot of the exterior of Glady's (aka the Grilled Cheese Place):



    The window guards will presumably be retracted during open hours.

    I was able to look inside at the interior thru the window: Looks like it will have table service. Carpentry equipment is still visible. Guys are working late tonight. ...they are on some kind of deadline.

  • We are definitely getting close, they started interviewing and hiring staff:

    Server:

    https://www.eatdrinkjobs.com/jobs/server-positions-available-now-crown-heights-brooklyn-full-time-part-time-server-515771b3291c270002000075?utm_source=Simply_HiredServerGladys0330

    Line Cook, with Sous Chef exp:

    https://www.eatdrinkjobs.com/jobs/line-cook-wsous-chef-opportunity-crown-heights-full-time-line-cook-sous-chef-5151c4330ee2860002000581?utm_source=Simply_HiredLine-Cook-Sous-ChefGladys0326

    We will be making frequent trips to the local farmers markets, procuring whole animals from some of the areas best farms and we will be working closely with Brooklyn's urban farms in order to obtain the best and freshest produce possible.

    Sounds like they will be going head-to-head with Mayfield, as opposed to just a fancy version of their truck.

  • i went in and talked to the owner last thurs. he said they open monday.

  • That's excellent news, and fits in with the carpentry contractors working late.

    I'll make the news larger, for those readers who simply skim:

    Hdaisy reports:

    i went in

    and talked to

    the owner last thurs.

    he said they

    open monday.



    This would be Monday, April 8

  • maybe i'll stop in on my way home. if i do, will report back.

  • I think this week will be used to work the kinks out, which will be followed by press releases announcing a grand opening.

    The management staff knows what they are doing.

  • When I walked by last night after work (Tuesday), there were a least a couple of people sitting inside and what looked like a wood burning oven (I saw fire). Has anyone tried it out yet?

  • According to today's article in GrubStreet, it's opening on Friday.

    And it's going to be amazing.

    http://newyork.grubstreet.com/2013/04/gladys-prospect-heights-michael-jacober-opening.html

  • Thanks howncreights!

    Pictures and quote from Grubstreet link, above

    The restaurant will open for dinner only for its first eight weeks or so, but then will add breakfast, lunch, and brunch hours. While its lineup and daily specials will change constantly, you can check out the opening menu below.

    Menu: http://images.nymag.com/images/2/daily/2013/04/gladys-menu.pdf

  • I walked past last night and saw a lot of people milling about inside, so I went in. They were having a staff family party according to the very nice girl who greeted me at the door. She confirmed that they are opening Friday. Pretty excited, it was really nice in there and I have a strong feeling the food is going to be awesome.

  • Also, I'm probably late to the game on this one, but apparently tomorrow is National Grilled Cheese Day. Apropos.

  • The menu says a grilled cheese is $6.

    Everything else will be fancier, and more expensive.

    ....We might have to run a comparison study.

    One side:

    The utility/joy received by a crack addict upon scoring a rock.

    The other side:

    The utility/joy received by a grilled cheese addict upon scoring a late night fix.

    I'd do my analysis using a Kant's Veil of Ignorance, Utilitarian method. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utilitarianism

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veil_of_ignorance

    It would be great.

  • Ms Whynot and I ate here tonight and found it was packed with people, fully staffed and operational, and yummy.

    There was some confusion over which of the wait staff was assigned to our table, which was resolved via a little assertiveness.

  • I had dinner there with a friend too. The place is very nice, the staff friendly and the food delicious. The nay down side are the chairs, they are very pretty but not that comfortable (especially for those of us who don t wear size 6 pants anymore). I was also amazed how packed it got by the time we left, way to get started! Everything went smoothly. Quite amazing considering that they had been "open for a half an hour" (according to the waiter) when we got there. Great addition to the hood. i will definitely be back!

  • Does anyone know if you 5:30 p.m. opening time is a daily thing?

  • Website seems to confirm that is the present opening time:

    http://gladysnyc.com/

    Note: When I ate there, they said that they would be open for lunch eventually, but not yet.

  • My husband stopped in here last night to take a look around, noticed a stack of menus by the door and began perusing one. When the hostess returned to greet him, he said he wasn't staying and that he just wanted a menu to take home. She told him he could not have one, that because they will be changing their menu daily, they could not let anyone take a menu home.

    WTF?

  • Just came back from eating here. I had "The Bubie" and the lady had "the best of both worlds." We both left with feeling deliciously full. Interior was cool too. There were no grilled cheeses on the menu

  • When they opened, this was their menu:

    http://images.nymag.com/images/2/daily/2013/04/gladys-menu.pdf

    It only had one grilled cheese on their menu "The Classic"

  • Not sure what kind of menu we got but none of that stuff was on there. There were a few "bar foods" about 5 sandwiches and a couple of sides. Drink menu was pretty extensive though. Nonetheless, we'll be back and I'm sure the menu will be fuller when we return

  • Despite being open for a couple of weeks, they are not open for lunch. They are only open during the evening, even on weekends.

    Based on all the people I saw walking around today, I think the neighborhood would make it worth their while if they opened for lunch.

  • Whynot, when I was in there they said it would be a couple of months before they were open for lunch. Not sure why.

    All told, I liked the place, but the sandwiches weren't as good as Lincoln Station, just down the street. The Rotisserie Chicken, however, was fantastic.

  • Lincoln Station is also open for lunch and appeared to be doing quite well when I ran by there on Friday afternoon.

  • Lincoln Station is PACKED at lunch. Lots of people working at that center table, and lots of people taking daytime meetings at the tables, from what I've seen.

  • Yes, I have seen the lunch crowds at Lincoln Station as well.

    ....which adds to my thesis that Glady's is missing out on a lot of customers while it gets its act together enough to also do lunch.

  • press:

    http://brooklynbased.net/email/2013/05/crown-heights-gets-cheesier/

    I do wonder if we will finally get grilled cheese offerings once it opens for lunch...

  • I wouldn't call Glady's cheap. They do good sandwiches but cheap they are not. Eight to twelve bucks for a sandwich with no chips and no fries is really pricey. Now if they had the beast sandwiches ever than yeah it would be worth the asking process.

    By the way they've been doing some funky stuff with obviously fake reviewers on Yelp. I really hope that's not their master plan for survival.

  • They do have less expensive grilled cheese sandwiches at their happy hour, 4-7. I just walked by today and saw a sign advertising this: perhaps I will go and report back on a day when the idea of eating anything hot seems less unappealing.

  • We went to Glady's tonight for the first time and were pleasantly surprised. Everything was delicious.

    The sandwiches were much better than Lincoln Station, with the bread perfectly toasted in the wood-burning oven, and creative combinations of spices and ingredients. I had the rotisserie chicken sandwich and my wife had the broccoli and cheese. The chicken was bursting with flavors of blue cheese, hot sauce, mayo, and smoke.

    The potato aioli and beet appetizers were also excellent. The service was clearly inexperienced but attentive, especially relative to other local establishments where one can easily be left waiting in need for unreasonable periods of time.

    No, it isn't cheap, and if you think that sandwiches must be cheap then do not go here. It's as expensive as Mayfield's or Bar Corvo. But the quality of the food is also in the same league. This is not a Subway.

  • I had the Bubbie (basically a Ruben) sandwich tonight. I think it was $12. It was worth it.

  • Is it just me, or do others think the single pane, 4" slat windows are a dumb choice?

    They do not keep the A/C in very well. They require those accordion style bars be used on every window. They are going to be drafty once winter returns.

  • dumb choice, but maybe they were cheap. ditto the window bars that only need a crow bar to get them out of the way. but you pays your money and you gets to choose.

  • Given that they have a full bar, it would not surprise me if local drunks decided it was a good target one night.

    They would use a bolt cutter or a crow bar, then swipe a few bottles with a few friends, and drink them at home. The safe would be left intact.

    I suspect those windows will be upgraded within the next year. Sunshine Co. (on Washington Ave), seems to have made much better window choices.

  • Whynot I think aesthetically it works really well! That being said I haven't heard of any bars or restaurants getting broken into in Crown Heights for awhile. I'd be really surprised if they didn't have any kind of security system.

  • Yes, I expect they have a security system too. However, the variety of drunk I am imagining doesn't really care if the police respond about 30 min after they are gone.

    Despite this, I really think the lack of insulation will be the reason they are upgraded.

    But we shall see.

  • Franklin seems to have a perpetual police presence. Patrol cars go up the block every couple of minutes.

    A retail establishment on Franklin would not be my first pick to burgle.

  • They just changed their menu (more entrées, fewer sandwiches) and are planning a grilled cheese and prepared foods spot "next door"

    http://www.grubstreet.com/2013/12/gladys-crown-heights-morris-grilled-cheese.html

    not sure what "next door" is because I think it's residential, so maybe two doors down?

  • Hmm. Just for fun, Glady's presently occupies what was a corner bodega, and a hair braiding place. Here is what 788 Franklin looked like just before the renovations.

    Next door, 786 Franklin is presently residential. However, with work it could be made commercial again:

    But based on the above, here is what could be in the works; The owner might be going West on Lincoln. 563 Lincoln and/or 565 Lincoln could be his destination:


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