• Yes the annoying people on dirtbikes are back! Those souls who have nothing better to do but go up and down the block again and again. All while gunning their engines and setting off car alarms are back! Oh yay!

    Oh, I almost forgot to mention the people who are kind enough to cruise down my block sharing their excellent taste in music with the whole borough.


  • I saw a guy selling water in traffic!

    this summer is looking similar to prior ones.

    Cherry flavored Icee, please.

    Were those gunshots or firecrackers?


  • they're back (sorry)


  • mr. met said:

    they're back (sorry)



    Don't be, stupid mistake on my part. Now fixed.


  • There is nothing that kills the joy of spring than the return of the idiots that can play their radios loud. So desperate are they for attention. poor schmucks.


  • If all goes according to plan, new people who live in historically loud neighborhoods will soon begin asking how to tactfully tell their neighbors to be quiet.

    ...a debate re: calling 311, moving to the suburbs, politeness, and/or wearing earplugs will ensure.

    Ah, summer in Brooklyn.


  • There was one guy whose system would shake up the whole apartment building. I just don't understand


  • Cool The Kid said:

    There was one guy whose system would shake up the whole apartment building. I just don't understand



    It's a rather disconcerting feeling looking at your framed pictures and wondering if their going to stay up, as the building shakes around you.

    Would calling 311 about the dirt bikes do any thing? I figure the cops have seen them around and elected not to do anything. So I kinda of doubt it.


  • The dirt bikes are able to outrun and embarrass the police, so the police are most interested in where they "live".

    Once they find this out, they will occasionally send an unmarked unit to wait until they get "home".

    Often:

    No M/C Lic.

    No insurance

    no lic plates.

    No registration

    Stolen.

    ....the guy gets a few tickets, but the bike ends up at auction.

    Smiles all around.


  • Ugh, if only I knew.

    It's my understanding most dirt bikes aren't road legal and hence can't get insurance, registration and plates.


  • Most of the dirt bikes you see in the street are enduro models with lights that are legal to register for road use.

    That said, you can't register a stolen bike.


  • Hmm, I know I've seen some without turn signals or headlights. It seems stupid to me to ride your stolen dirt bike in the same place over and over again since either the cops or the owner might come looking. I'd be more worried about the owner.


  • The biggest danger to these guys is often themselves.


  • My biggest peeve are the ones who honk their horn in gridlocked traffic - like people are stopped just for the sake of it. Then there are the ghetto DJs that turn public parks into their own private day/night clubs that operate from 10.30 a.m. until 3 a.m.


  • bohuma said:

    My biggest peeve are the ones who honk their horn in gridlocked traffic - like people are stopped just for the sake of it.


    This! It takes me a couple weeks to adjust to sleeping with the windows open do to honking and the Borough wide entertainment network aka cars pumping out music.

    I've noticed that some people honk at me when on my bike. Over on the side of the road honk? "Honk! Honk!" In a bike lane? "Honnnk! Honk!"


  • I soooo hope that the comments from the people overseas who rent bike share in NYC are collected and published.

    The reading will be awesome.


  • newguy88 said:

    I've noticed that some people honk at me when on my bike. Over on the side of the road honk? "Honk! Honk!" In a bike lane? "Honnnk! Honk!"


    I always tap my horn twice to let a bike know I am coming by especially if its a narrow street.


  • whynot_31 said:

    I soooo hope that the comments from the people overseas who rent bike share in NYC are collected and published.

    The reading will be awesome.


    Wrong thread?


  • Nope. I think we will get lots of comments like yours, that express amazement at NY drivers who (until now) have owned the road.


  • stacey said:

    I always tap my horn twice to let a bike know I am coming by especially if its a narrow street.



    Please don't! All your honking does is A. scare the cyclist or B. contributes to noise pollution.

    Nope. I think we will get lots of comments like yours, that express amazement at NY drivers who (until now) have owned the road.

    I disagree with this notion. NYC drivers have always shared the road with cyclists. It's just we are now becoming more prevalent on the road. And are becoming more vocal about our rights to be on the road.


  • stacey said:

    I always tap my horn twice to let a bike know I am coming by especially if its a narrow street.


    As a cyclist, I generally interpret that as a threat. A loud noise fast approaching from the behind triggers primal fear.


  • stacey said:

    I always tap my horn twice to let a bike know I am coming by especially if its a narrow street.


    Stacey why you shouldn't honk at us. http://adamp.com/bike-2/why-drivers-shouldnt-honk-at-cyclists/


  • Thanks guys - now I feel bad, I thought I was just giving them a heads up that I am passing. Just and FYI I didn't honk loudly just two quick little taps of my horn. But now I know and will have to break myself of that habit.

    newguy nice article but I don't beep for them to get out of the way - I beep so they know I am coming by. But I can see the frustration.


  • Thanks for being thoughtful and willing to change. Car engines are generally pretty loud, so a bicyclist can almost always hear a car coming.

    Here's a fun article about other things drivers do that can be scary for bikers:

    http://www.redeyechicago.com/news/redeye-top-10-mistakes-drivers-make-around-bikers-20130412,0,2481110.story


  • whynot_31 said:



    ------------------------

    The dirt bikes are able to outrun and embarrass the police, so the police are most interested in where they "live".

    Once they find this out, they will occasionally send an unmarked to wait until they get "home".

    Often:

    No M/C Lic.

    No insurance

    no lic plates.

    No registration

    Stolen.

    ....the guy gets a few tickets, but the bike ends up at auction.

    Smiles all around.



    Although not a dirt bike, I submit this case in point re: some of our local motorcyclists:

    May 27, 2013. Rogers and St. Johns


    ----------------------------


    ChInfo wrote: Two women traveling on Rogers Avenue were hurt after their car was rear ended by a reckless motorcyclist, who after crashing hopped onto another cyclists bike and fled. The motorcycle did not have valid registration or insurance.

    The incident occurred Sunday night at around 10:00pm at the intersection of Rogers Avenue and S. Johns Place.

    An off duty MTA bus driver who witnessed the crash told CrownHeights.info “I was on my way home when I saw two motorcyclists speeding up [Rogers Avenue], weaving between cars, when one of them slipped and fell of his bike which skidded away and slammed into the car.”

    The force of the impact pushed the bike under the car and lifting it in the air. “The biker got back up and jumped on the second bike and together fled the scene, one of the women from the car was begging him to stay” said the witness.

    Both the driver of the car and a passenger suffered neck and back injuries and were transported by EMS to local hospitals.

    http://crownheights.info/accidents/387254/motorcyclist-crashes-flees-scene/#comments


  • yeah the guys on the dirt bikes also ride thru Brower park and go the wrong way down streets. The auxiliaries try to catch them.


  • They should shoot them if they fail to stop. In the name of public safety.


  • Yeah I saw that. I still prefer shooting to ramming.


  • maybe we can compromise and shoot them after we ram them.


  • Eastbloc and Tsarina-

    Such decisions are rarely left up to the general populace.

    Here's an account of a different incident that also happened on May 27th:

    CHinfo wrote: The crash occurred at around 5:00pm near the intersection of Utica Avenue and Crown Street. The cyclists was traveling down Utica and according to eyewitnesses was weaving in between cars when he rear ended a red Nissan SUV.

    The force of the impact sent the rider into the rear window, and partially into the car, then coming to rest on the ground.

    The ChInfo readers were quick enough to get a photo of the guy being loaded into the ambulance, and the car window he hit:

    http://crownheights.info/accidents/386935/motorcyclist-dies-after-crashing-into-suv/#comments


  • I guess he didnt save alot of time weaving in and out of traffic.


  • He was running late for his accident.


  • Since we've started talking about motorcycles I've started paying attention to them. And it seems that many either don't have plates or bend the plate so it can't be read. That guy is so lucky to be alive. I wonder if he if he can walk or will ever be able to again.


  • Motorcycle accidents like this are a rite of Spring, and often involve very inexperienced, young riders.

    As the saying goes:

    There are some old ones.

    There are some bold ones.

    There are very few old, bold ones.


  • there is a reason they call them donorcycles.


  • The guys that are mobbing up the streets doing wheelies and evading cops are mostly on stolen bikes.

    Perfectly legitimate motorcycles are often parked without plates to keep the plates from being stolen (for use by the above) and to discourage ticketing.


  • I remember reading a statistic that a full 33% of people on motorcycles don't have the "M" endorsement on their license.

    Meaning that they haven't even taken the road and written tests, much less a basic safety course on how to ride.

    ...the only things they know, they have learned thru trial and error, and what a friend has shown them.


  • And this is why motorcycle policies do not have no fault coverage meaning that if you end up in the hospital you pay for your treatment until it's settled that you weren't at fault. This is unlike car policies that automatically pay for medical treatment no matter who's at fault.


  • The fact that insurance doesn't have to pay, just means that in many cases, Medicaid ends up paying.

    ....most of the injured don't have a lot of assets.


  • id really like to see statistics on assets, motorcycle ownership/ridership, and accident rates. seems like quite an ambitious hypothesis.


  • My hypothesis is tied to the ages of the men who seem to be disportionately involved in motorcycle accidents, those aged 17 - 35.

    As one might suspect, this group also tends to ride the bikes with the most power.

    Another emerging trend of concern to public health and safety experts is the growing popularity of racing-style motorcycles known as supersports, which have high power-to-weight ratios and are capable of extreme acceleration and speed (160+ mph). Although designed for the racetrack, supersport motorcycles are marketed and sold to the general public and have become especially popular among young riders. On September 11, 2007, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) released a report showing that "motorcyclists who ride supersports have driver death rates per 10,000 registered motorcycles nearly 4 times higher than motorcyclists who ride all other types of bikes."10

    The IIHS report also noted that among fatally injured motorcycle drivers, those riding supersports are the youngest, with an average age of 27. For both 2000 and 2005, the death rate for riders of supersport bikes is twice that of sport bike riders and four times that for riders of other motorcycle types (See table 6).

    http://www.rita.dot.gov/bts/sites/rita.dot.gov.bts/files/publications/special_reports_and_issue_briefs/special_report/2009_05_14/html/entire.html

    In NYC, and perhaps throughout the nation, young men have been hardest hit by the recession (aka "new normal"), and have high rates of unemployment, which is closely correlated to assets. ...such young men have disportionately few financial assets.

    If coupled with a poor education and a wealth of other social markers, these same men seem to be most at risk of engaging in all sorts of high risk behavior, such as violent crime, and (I purport) the type of motorcycling I classify as "reckless".

    Programs strive to get them to be more connected to society as well as take charge of their own well being:

    http://www.nyc.gov/html/ymi/downloads/pdf/young_mens_initiative_annual_report_2012.pdf


  • Page 33 states that about 25% of motorcyclist fatalities lacked the proper licensure:

    http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Pubs/810606.PDF

    While a national stat, my premise is that the rate of non-compliance is even higher in a low-income urban area (such as Crown Heights).

    When combined, these factors exaggerate the racial disparities in motorcycle injuries and fatalities that are evident throughout the nation:

    https://www.meddium.com/content/Assets_950000-999999/asset_957418/file_metadata_957417.pdf


  • eastbloc said:

    Perfectly legitimate motorcycles are often parked without plates to keep the plates from being stolen (for use by the above) and to discourage ticketing.



    They might be better off buying locking bolts and nuts for their plates.


  • Why would that be better?


  • 1) your link does not provide adequate information stating where the highest concentration of these motorcycles is located. i do not believe it's in brooklyn.

    2) the price of one of these motorcycles can be thousands of dollars, with several models exceeding a sticker price of 10k.

    based on the limited information you've given, it's actually more likely that people who have the assets to afford buying those motorcycles would be the ones with higher rates of accidents, because they are the ones more likely to be riding them. the link that you've provided regarding race and motorcycle accidents is interesting, but largely counterproductive to your argument. according to that article, though blacks are more likely to DIE in accidents, there are more white people actually riding motorcycles. secondly, and perhaps most detrimental to your argument of risk taking behavior, is this fact:

    "Crude helmet use among black motorcyclists was 79.1%,

    compared with 77.3% for whites. When adjusting for age,

    sex, insurance status, and year of admission, blacks were

    found to have a higher odds (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.19–1.43)of wearing a helmet than their white counterparts"

    lastly, the wrap up of the article makes the point i'd like to stress.

    "It is not clear why blacks are more likely to die after a

    MC... First, it is

    possible that the mechanisms that underlie other racial disparities in health outcomes—lack of insurance, reduced

    access to care, poorer quality of care, greater comorbidi-

    ties—are likely at play here."

    if you want to argue lack of access to healthcare or insurance, fine. but please don't argue that people of color die because of their own reckless behavior and need to be saved from themselves. its both racist and classist.


  • "people of color die because of their own reckless behavior"

    Such a statement would be far too broad.

    "and need to be saved from themselves"

    In situations where one is a danger to themselves, there is often very little anyone else can do.

    Motorcycle injuries are often so severe (aka expensive) that even those with private insurance quickly exhaust it and end up on medicaid.

    http://www.nhtsa.gov/people/injury/pedbimot/motorcycle/motorcycle_html/overview.html


  • i mean, im just pointing out that your argument doesn't have much basis, despite the attempt to quantify it. stating that young black men are more likely to engage in violent crime in nyc because of the recession is a broad statement too. violent crime has gone down in nyc in the time of the recession.

    also, latinos have been most hard hit by the recession in terms of loss of assets, with asian americans second hardest hit, followed by african americans. and its actually women who have been hit harder, at least on a global scale (though in the us women have fared better than their male counterparts, but those who are unemployed have a harder time finding a job) not young black men. and i dont see many angry asian american or latino women carrying out violent crimes or engaging in behavior where they are a danger to themselves. so your argument is based on a whole lot of nothing except preconceptions about a certain group: low income black men. and that's an issue when we live where we live. just calling it like i see it.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/26/us/26hispanics.html?_r=0

    http://www.stanford.edu/group/recessiontrends/cgi-bin/web/sites/all/themes/barron/pdf/LaborMarkets_fact_sheet.pdf

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-21088042


  • "stating that young black men are more likely to engage in violent crime in nyc because of the recession is a broad statement too. violent crime has gone down in nyc in the time of the recession."

    Crime or unemployment can not be simply tied to things like the recession, ones age, gender or hue. One needs to know lots of things to predict them.

    In the case of unemployment, where one lives, ones skill set, legal status, whether one is disabled, etc all play roles.

    In the case of crime, one looks at things known as criminogenic risk factors.

    http://www.samhsa.gov/co-occurring/topics/criminal-justice/screening.aspx

    http://www.ncsl.org/print/cj/sf-kooyppt.pdf

    Even then, crime (or unemployment) is by no means a certainty. Likewise, if one could somehow eliminate all of the risk factors, it does not eliminate the risk that a person will commit a crime, become (or stay) unemployed, or (in this case) not crash a motorcycle.

    Quite simply, these guys crashed. ...soon, some more of them will crash.

    Then, as they do every Spring, some staffers at the DMV will tabulate the numbers of motorcycle fatalities in NYC from the preceding year. Because most motorcyclists in NYC wear a helmet, it should come as no surprise that most motorcyclists who died in prior years in NYC were wearing a helmet. Page 6

    http://www.dmv.ny.gov/Statistics/2011NYCCrashSummary.pdf

    This summer won't be any different: Those who are injured and/or die will tend to share many things in common with each other.

    Some groups/demographics will be disproportionately represented.

    Some will defy the odds, and live to become old and bold. Others will trash motorcycles.


  • So I have a question at what point would you all call the cops on a fight going on your block at 4 am or 3 am ish?

    Last night this morning it sounded like a group of guys got into a yelling match down the block. One guy kept saying "I'm going to go over and F you up." Normally I just ignore this but then one guy kept pushing him to do it. Apparently the guy yelling about "F'ing" the other guy was slighted in some way. I got kinda of concerned that the aggrieved party would go over and seek restitution. I laid in bed and debated whether I should call 911 or not. Fortunately they went quiet and I went back to bed.

    But I was wondering should I have called the cops? I really thought these guys were going to start beating each other!

    P.S. Before anyone says it I'm not moving upstate or to NJ.


  • According to some, whenever you call the police, it is an act of racism, classism, and/or cultural imperialism UNLESS the defendants are the exact same race, class and culture as yourself.

    That said, I'd begin calling after 1 AM on a summer night.

    That is when I believe my right to sleep should outweigh their right to make noise.

    Some people are likely glad I am not their neighbor.


  • I call when:

    1)It is apparent that its going to escalate from yelling to something more; or

    2)If it has gone on for more than ten minutes;or

    3)If I feel like both parties would turn on me if I opted to go downstairs to tell them that a)they woke me up and b)could they keep it down


  • I have an 'M' endorsement on my license. I got it by driving motorcycles around a parking lot for a weekend in California. I would be absolutely terrified to ride a motorcycle in NYC traffic.


  • Newguy, I'm pretty sure you've mentioned you're on or near the same block as me, park and nostrand/rogers. Don't hesitate to call the cops. The last weekend a fight was escalating which spawned a "warning" shot followed by a "you scared now?" The cops showed up almost immediately as the gunman took off but with the weather starting to warm up, it will be a familiar scene.


  • While still present, the gun shots and the illegal dirt bikes seem to be less familiar in CH than they were in the past.

    The police do what they can (but as discussed above and in the article that follows), their ability to intervene is restrained by many factors:

    http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20120419/harlem/dirt-bike-riders-terrorize-harlem-but-say-they-just-want-place-ride


  • Now that we have bikeshare, hopefully we can redirect these young men to safer and more responsible forms of sick wheelies:



  • Although difficult to achieve, that would be additional progress!


  • Epiclyaterd, Yeah I live really close to you. I'm On Park between Nostrand and New York.

    In the future I'll call the cops the second I think a fight could get violent.


  • This may be a stupid question, but when one decides to call the cops regarding a situation, what number do you call? Is it 911 or is there something more local for the Crown Heights area?


  • call the 77th pct. and press 0 for operator. a officer will usually answer.


  • ehgee said:

    Now that we have bikeshare, hopefully we can redirect these young men to safer and more responsible forms of sick wheelies:



    While not able to compete with the thrill and risk of riding an unlicensed, motorcycle or quad on busy city streets, it still looks like fun!

    A BMX bike course on a Brooklyn construction site:

    http://www.brownstoner.com/blog/2013/06/closing-bell-dirt-bike-track-going-in-domino-site/


  • Sadly the BMX park is just temporary.


  • Note:

    These guys were out in mass this weekend, but they are not the same as the aforemententioned ones whom ride around on quads and dirt bikes, without helmets, doing wheelies and in public parks:

    http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20130722/crown-heights/motorcycle-clubs-converge-on-crown-heights-for-blessing-of-bikes


  • The NYPD has been seizing lots of illegal ATV and dirt bikes in The Bronx.

    Perhaps we could get whoever coordinated this effort to work in Brooklyn next year?

    http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/bronx/nypd-puts-flat-tire-atvs-dirt-bikes-article-1.1457617


  • It sounds like some residents of Red Hook would appreciate the effort as well:

    http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20131008/red-hook/atvs-dirt-bikes-wreak-havoc-red-hook-residents-say


  • Washington Heights is having its share of problems with off road motorcycles (aka dirt bikes) as well:http://dnain.fo/1fs7x5d
  • A cop recently tried to stop a ATV that was being operated in ENY, and was dragged.

    http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20140304/east-new-york/suspect-cleared-of-dragging-police-officer-behind-atv

    It should be interesting to see how the police address the issue now that the weather is again warming up, and unauthorized vehicles become more common.

  • If past experience is any indication, they're going to address the issue by going after law-abiding motorcyclists that have nothing to do with it.
  • I suspect you are correct.

    As the city gentrifies, it will have less tolerance for 14 year old, shirt-less, helmet-less youth riding ATVs and dirtbikes around Grand Army Plaza, and up and down Fulton Street and Eastern Parkway.

    I witnessed each several times last summer.
  • Something I figured out a while ago was that in neighborhoods like this, cops prefer to stop and ticket older, seemingly law-abiding people rather than going after youngsters (mostly guys) that may actually be up to something. Stopping the guy on a cruiser with plates means you can issue a ticket but he won't try and run away, causing you to have to chase him. Pulling over the woman in her car with four kids for putting on her seat belt as she pulls away from the curb is a much better bet than stopping the two guys driving down the street with the bass cranked up, windows down, weed smoke billowing and out of state plates.
  • Yes, if you have a quota, there is no need to reach it the hard way.

    ...stopping a juvenile is also fraught. They often don't fear death (if you chase them and they crash into a pole it looks bad), and even if they pull over nicely, the cop may have to arrange for them to be released to their parent. This means the cop is useless for the rest of the shift.

    Meanwhile, an adult without a helmet and motorcycle lic can just be given a DAT.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desk_appearance_ticket

    And, the cop is only out of service until a flatbed truck arrives to bring the bike to impound.
  • The NYPD says it isn't fooling around anymore:


    ---> Asked if they were waiting for dirt-bike riders, an officer in an unmarked black S.U.V. said, “That’s exactly what we’re doing.”

    Sunday’s colder weather might have deterred bigger groups, said the officer, who declined to give his name. “But you never know,” he said. “We’re ready to pounce.” <---.<br />.
    .


    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/10/nyregion/warm-weather-brings-out-banned-vehicles-and-officers-pounce.html?ref=nyregion
  • I hope they have more than one car per stakeout. Last summer I was driving on Rockaway when the cops caught up with a group of motorcyclists/ATV riders at the corner of Kings Highway. It was like a chase scene from The Benny Hill Show. There was one patrol car practically driving in circles while the bikers were going every which way around them -- including up onto the concrete medians and out into the intersection. It seemed impossible that the cops would actually catch one of them, and the chase was making things much more dangerous for pedestrians and other drivers.
  • Nothinlike-

    Are you referencing the nypd skateboard video?

    http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2cF8oA0zn7A



  • Unlicensed Harlem Biker Gang vs NYPD

  • I'm glad the NYPD is making, at least a some token, effort to confront this. Between this and the double parking tickets could things finally be changing at One Police Plaza? 
  • When they advertise that people should use the Crimestoppers number to anonomously report where the dirt bikes and ATVs "live" in exchange for a reward, I'll perceive them as doing all they can.

    They probably can't go on private property yo get them, but they might be able to just wait for them to come home after they play.
  • This dirt bike rider in the Bronx managed to kill himself and injure two others, as he attempted to pass a car making a left turn.

    http://gothamist.com/2014/03/22/dirt_bike_rider_killed_while_trying.php
  • As you once said there is the old and the bold. Sadly this guy injured two innocent people on his way out. 
  • This man only killed himself:

    "A young man performing a stunt on a dirt bike was killed when he collided with a car and a box truck in East Harlem Tuesday afternoon, officials and witnesses said.

    Shamel Jefferson, 28, was performing a wheelie up Third Avenue near East 105th Street about 12:45 p.m. when he clipped a red four-door sedan making a left turn onto 105th Street, witnesses and police said."
    http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20140506/east-harlem/biker-hurt-east-harlem-crash-officials-say
  • Our Pct is getting good at trapping these guys without insurance on dirt bikes. Last summer they set up snares and bagged a couple to impound. which ended one group that was on Nostrand at the time.  They chased them down Park Place into waiting cops near Brower pk.
    I would like to hear anyone who knows what does the law say about the muffler noise we have to tolerate from these bikes. Of course the noise tells everyone where they are which is good to catch.
  • You may enjoy a trip to Red Hook. 

    Take Van Brunt St to the end.  

    Buy ice cream at Fairway.

    Then, walk out on the long pier that is on the left of Fairway.   From the end, you will get an excellent view of all of the motorcycles in the NYPD impound lot. Many of them are illegal dirt bikes. 

    You'll find the location is crowded with people enjoying views of the Statue of Liberty, but that can be seen from lots of locations around the city.    
  • My neighbor is a motorbike hobbiest who teaches his son how to wheelie. Interesting father son bonding, unfortunately it is on the sidewalk!
  • I was on a tour of NY Harbor with a bunch of high school kids a few weeks ago. The thing they got the most excited about? The dirtbike collection in the impound lot. A few of them even pledged to go online and see when the next auction was coming up to try and get a bike for cheap.

    Ah, the NYC circle of life...
  • I do wonder how often the average NYC dirt bike and quads have done the circle: 

    Seized,

    Sold at NYC auction to a bulk buyer, 

    Sold by the bulk buyer for a few hundred bucks to a teen without a high school diploma, or a M/C license, in a low income neighborhood, 

    Ridden illegally on the streets

    Seized...
  • The new NYPD Comissioner seems to know that this is an issue that the public would like addressed:

    http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2014/06/08/citywide-crackdown-nets-13-illegal-motorcycles-dirt-bikes/

    I suspect very few people are "pro illegal dirtbike"
  • Thirteen gone leaving hundreds more including the group of at least six that mounted the sidewalk at Nostrand and Eastern at around 7:30 on Saturday to get around traffic stopped at the light. But at least they're doing something. 
  • I think the picture used in the above article is from the Brooklyn lot discussed above, but could be from one of the others.
  • If we can find their garages and let the police know where the bikes are kept perhaps someone can catch them. I have over heard them bragging about dodging police and about the numbers of police put watching.  But then the "circle" never ends as long as the police keep the bikes alive. And why is that? The police don't resell guns?
  • Yesterday I nearly flipped out when a guy riding an ATV mounted the promenade at Eastern Parkway and New York Avenue around 3:00pm. Seriously, WTF is wrong with these people? I really don't mind people riding motorbikes. Yes, they can be loud and obnoxious sounding, but I can deal with that. It is the riding on sidewalks and popping wheelies on sidewalks, with seemingly no regard for pedestrians, that drives me bonkers.
  • In the present environment, chasing young riders who are wearing no protection from injuries is very fraught.

    Instead, the police focus on figuring out where the bikes are stored via various methods:

    http://m.nydailynews.com/new-york/bronx/nypd-puts-flat-tire-atvs-dirt-bikes-article-1.1457617

    Like guns, drugs, etc, I suspect the dirt bikes come into to the hands of low incone teenage boys thru a variety of means:

    -some are stolen by "professional thieves" rom rural areas in the region, transported to NYC and then resold here.

    -some are bought by resellers at the sheriff auctions held at the NYC impound lots.

    -some are bought by resellers at the auctions held by other states and municipalities, and then transported to NYC.

    -some are stolen within the city, from other youth.

    I've been in the NYC area since 1993, and can't remember a summer I didn't see them.
  • Yes, they can be loud and obnoxious sounding, but I can deal with that. 



    I can deal with it too... but this too is still a really shitty way to behave.  They are a menace to the neighborhoods they race and roar through... which is exactly their intended message.  Just showing off how "tough" they are.  Because, you know, sitting and lightly pressing a pedal takes a lot of manly effort.
  • Agree.  It's embarrassing that they think using a machine to make loud noise is tough, when it just takes a light twist of the throttle...and this is coming from someone who used to ride a motorcycle (in L.A.) for years.  

    There's nothing tough about a machine that is a fraction the weight of a car, falls over easily, can be sent flying by a tiny bit of loose dirt/water on a turn, and has a pipsqueak horn.  They are however fun and liberating to ride....responsibly.
  • Yes, many of the youth ride as if they believe they are not going to live to see age 25.

    ...many of them are correct.
  • Some of them won't make it to 25. The real question is are they going to take anyone else with them?
  • The belief that one isn't going to make it to 25 often becomes a self fulfilling prophesy.

    However, most young men (even the ones being discussed) DO make it to 25.

    ...of those, lot of them celebrate their birthday while incarcerated.

    Readers should try to get photos of the next group of urban dirt bikers (and ATV riders) they see.
  • Commander Lott stated tonight that his officers are not to pursue motorcycles.

    Despite this, they have confiscated about 13 since the start of warmer weather. They are able to confiscate them when the users need to fill them up with gas, or by going to where they are stored.
  • There's good news! Thanks, Whynot, you made my day.       I met someone in NCH hood who used to be one of those wheelie poppers, he is about 35 now and only in the past couple years gave it up doing it himself but still teaches his son how to. So we have a long time of this "don't tell me where I can't play" attitude.