The NY Post writes a piece about Crown Heights
  • Spoiler alert: They say it is filled with normal people.

    ...Now?
    image
    Don Doe had his eyes on Crown Heights for more than a decade. An artist, Doe purchased a brownstone in the neighborhood 12 years ago, using one unit as his…
  • I find the headline pretty insulting. Otherwise, ditto what Montrose Morris said in the comments http://www.brownstoner.com/blog/2014/04/ny-post-looks-at-crown-heights-boom/#comments


  • There is a very specific moment in time that the author seems to find a neighborhood livable.

    For western CH, that moment is now. 

    For Prospect Heights, that moment was 2008. PH is now very similar to Park Slope, so he might not consider it livable anymore.

    BTW, Western CH looks on track to be identical to PS and PH in 2016.
  • I could pretty much guarantee that any article featuring someone who calls himself "Don Doe" would be annoying. 
  • These people were "pioneers" in Crown Heights. Somehow I don't think so. I guess the Post thinks that all the people who were living here for the last 30 years should be put on reservations sort of like what the pioneers did to the native Americans.
  • Seems like just a simple pro realestate article alerting home seekers or small businesses of this vibrant area, nothing more. What is annoying, that it talks about values of land? What , should everything be listed as a neutered classified ad in order not to be annoying?
  • Not sure why people, especially on brownstoner, were so up in arms over the article.  For the most part its true, prices went up, crime has gone down, more amenities have come.  The 'pioneer' comment is the only main cringe-worthy douchey comment.  

    The Lenape indians were the first pioneers here.  Then displaced by various europeans, then displaced by other europeans, then blacks/hasidics and on it'll go
  • yeah the "pioneer" label was subjective flourish by the author, unfortunately for the Does. 12 years ago was very scary times even on Franklin Ave., where that young boy was hit by stray bullet.
  • These people were "pioneers" in Crown Heights. Somehow I don't think so. I guess the Post thinks that all the people who were living here for the last 30 years should be put on reservations sort of like what the pioneers did to the native Americans.



    From context, The Post seems to mean "pioneers" in terms of the recent trend of gentrification. Twelve years ago I can imagine the guy profiled in the article probably got comments like "Are you crazy?" when he stated in which neighborhood he was going to buy.
  • My business has been in this area about 50 years....way before I got into it. Many of my clients have been living here all that time. Many of them own more than one property and make their living off of real estate which they own in this area. I guess because they didn't need gourmet restaurants and coffee houses they weren't gentrifiers but they did manage to stay through the hard times.
  • I don't think the newbies "need" the fancy coffee houses and restaurants, as much as they have the means and preferences that support such places.

  • Coffee houses are crucial to change as it allows anyone to sit and view the street,(deter crime by being a witness) enjoy the flow of community, a pause in the hood outside your apartment. It gives the appearance of integration and welcome. Everyone goes there and mingles if the coffee is good and the pastries better.
  • The real original  gentrifiers in this era of CH might just be the Crown Heights North Historical Association who started the processof getting the area on the National Registry of Historic places. The founders all grew up here, all home owners, all interested in lowering crime. This is not a recent trend but was started in the 1970's. The rehabilitation of the houses is the new trend spurning migration.
  • Crown Heights' excellent housing stock definitely makes me vastly prefer it to Williamsburg/Greenpoint, where there's so much rundown woodframe/vinyl stuff renting for obscene prices.
  • Actually, it seems to me that the newcomer hipsters really do seem to need those coffee houses, restaurants, and, especially, bars. The idea of cooking for oneself or even making a cup of coffee at home is simply anathema to most of them. They need to be seen and to be out and about. These amenities are more important to them than drug stores, pharmacies, banks, and (horrors!) non-organic small batch bakeries. To me, people who have the hours to spend in those coffee houses must really have very little going on in their lives and much too much disposable income.
  • Do you think the long time residents would engage in similar leisure activities, if they had similar means?

    Note, "Youth" could be defined as a means.
  • We sometimes have the means, depending on the month and bills, and I wouldn't want to be in those cafes. Much of what is being built does seems to cater to the "youth" moving in and not to folks who've been in the area a long-time, whether that be yellow, pink, or blue. This disturbs and saddens me.

    To a certain level, the "youth" have a level of narcissism and entitlement never before seen in previous generations. I have seen it in some of the "youth" who have moved into our building. Whether they be from China or the 'burbs. On the other hand, I have seen some nice "youth" who do not demonstrate these traits.

    Perhaps, in the end, it's simply in how folks where raised:)
  • Actually, I don't think most long time residents would engage in these activities, whynot_31. I know I wouldn't and I certainly have the means to do so. I know I simply would not waste my money that way. In the end, I like to have something to show for my expenditures.
  • Actually, it seems to me that the newcomer hipsters really do seem to need those coffee houses, restaurants, and, especially, bars. The idea of cooking for oneself or even making a cup of coffee at home is simply anathema to most of them. 
    morralkan said:

    Cooking is an anathema to me, and I'm a native! No hate for that! LOL

    These amenities are more important to them than drug stores, pharmacies, banks, and (horrors!) non-organic small batch bakeries. To me, people who have the hours to spend in those coffee houses must really have very little going on in their lives and much too much disposable income.


    I've seen comments from posters on other boards and sites (like the Q at Parkside) who would welcome new banks being built (like the TD Bank on Bedford Avenue). Some people are also excited about the new Walgreens coming to Empire Boulevard. (I know I am!) 

    Some of those people hanging out in the cafes are doing some reading/schoolwork. You may wonder, why do it there instead of going to campus. It may be more comfortable to do some of this in a nearby cafe (assuming they live in the area) than to take the train all the way to campus on a weekend.

    Some others may use the cafe as a place to meet up with friends. (How many people have friends over anymore? How does that work when one has roommates?) 

  • Dawndew said:

    Coffee houses are crucial to change as it allows anyone to sit and view the street,(deter crime by being a witness) enjoy the flow of community, a pause in the hood outside your apartment. It gives the appearance of integration and welcome. Everyone goes there and mingles if the coffee is good and the pastries better.



    I see some of this happening at Tip of the Tongue (which does have really good pastries!).

    Do coffee houses really deter crime? What happens on Lincoln Road when Tip of the Tongue closes at 7 pm? On the other hand. does the Dunkin Donuts on Empire Boulevard really help deter crime because it's open 24 hours?
  • Western Crown Heights has become something of a destination, where young people get some fun things done (dating, finishing grad school, navel gazing).

    Then, after about 2 years, they leave.

    They are sometimes replaced by people who look so similar to them that it looks like it is the same people just frittering away lots of time, money and energy for years on end.

    ....but it actually is not.
  • i wonder what is was like here 90 years ago and if in fact the trends now are just a return to earlier livestyles. The roaring twenties happened right here!
  • If they start building apartments with live in maid quarters again, I'll conclude the roaring 20s are back.

  • Esperanza said:

    Actually, it seems to me that the newcomer hipsters really do seem to need those coffee houses, restaurants, and, especially, bars. The idea of cooking for oneself or even making a cup of coffee at home is simply anathema to most of them. They need to be seen and to be out and about. These amenities are more important to them than drug stores, pharmacies, banks, and (horrors!) non-organic small batch bakeries. To me, people who have the hours to spend in those coffee houses must really have very little going on in their lives and much too much disposable income.



    As a youthful newcomer, I don't spend all that much time or money in coffeeshops or bars because I make my own coffee and now, thanks to Bitters & Esters, beer. But the folks who do are just paying a bit of rent on a place to socialize, and maybe work or study— plenty of folks these days work remotely, and working exclusively from home without ever leaving to, say, a coffeeshop, is apparently maddening.

    On the other hand, I do all my banking online, so don't really have any need for a bank branch. And I fortunately have good health, so I likewise don't need a pharmacy. 

    I do appreciate that my part of Crown Heights, at least, is very well-served by neighborhood services like grocery stores and tailors and a homebrew store and a good beer store and other useful small businesses. It's mostly just Franklin that feels like a pure entertainment district.
  • Glitch in the Iphone it seems, this is what I said:

    "We sometimes have the means, depending on the month and bills, and I wouldn't want to be in those cafes. Much of what is being built does seems to cater to the "youth" moving in and not to folks who've been in the area a long-time, whether that be yellow, pink, or blue. This disturbs and saddens me.To a certain level, the "youth" have a level of narcissism and entitlement never before seen in previous generations. I have seen it in some of the "youth" who have moved into our building. Whether they be from China or the 'burbs. On the other hand, I have seen some nice "youth" who do not demonstrate these traits."
  • ehgee said:

    Esperanza said:

    On the other hand, I do all my banking online, so don't really have any need for a bank branch. And I fortunately have good health, so I likewise don't need a pharmacy. 




    That may work for you, but sometimes someone has to withdraw a large amount of cash or get a cashier's check. I don't think you can do that online. ;) 

    Kudos for having good health. Yet, what happens if you get the cold or the flu? What happens if you were to wake up with a fever at 3 am? Last month when I had the flu, I would have appreciated having a Walgreens nearby to fill my prescription instead of waiting around in the one near Atlantic Center when I felt like I could barely stand, and still having to make a 20-minute ride home by mass transit. A 24-hour pharmacy is better, many small neighborhood pharmacies of course are not open 24 hours. 

    It's nice to have things like that nearby in case you need them.
  • ehgee said:

    Esperanza said:

    On the other hand, I do all my banking online, so don't really have any need for a bank branch. And I fortunately have good health, so I likewise don't need a pharmacy. 




    That may work for you, but sometimes someone has to withdraw a large amount of cash or get a cashier's check. I don't think you can do that online. ;) 

    Kudos for having good health. Yet, what happens if you get the cold or the flu? What happens if you were to wake up with a fever at 3 am? Last month when I had the flu, I would have appreciated having a Walgreens nearby to fill my prescription instead of waiting around in the one near Atlantic Center when I felt like I could barely stand, and still having to make a 20-minute ride home by mass transit. A 24-hour pharmacy is better, many small neighborhood pharmacies of course are not open 24 hours. 

    It's nice to have things like that nearby in case you need them.

    When I needed an apartment deposit, I got a money order.

    I certainly agree a 24-hour drugstore with generic-brand medicines would be nice. But a Duane Reade is a stereotypical symbol of gentrification, so it'll surely come right around when the Starbucks does. And isn't it standard practice to lament chain stores driving out small local businesses?

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Login with Facebook