That warehouse for spices on Franklin, near Sullivan, used to be a brewery
  • The buildings predate Ebbets Field Stadium, which predate Ebbets Field Houses Apartments....

    Most of the buildings are gone, but the one in use by the Spice company remains.

    Crown Height's Consumers Park Brewery on Franklin Ave.

    In 1908, when Charley Ebbets was looking around Brooklyn for a place to build his ballpark, he decided on an obscure part of town near Prospect Park that lay in between the neighborhoods of Flatbush and the St. Marks District. It was called Crow Hill, and was undeveloped, an ash dump, actually, with little going on except for a couple of rambling industrial complexes. One of these industrial groups was the Flatbush Hygeia Ice Company, at 984 Franklin Avenue, and the other was home to the Consumers Park Brewery; a complex of buildings that made the beverage that helped make Brooklyn: lager beer. For Charles Ebbets this was perfect, for what goes better than baseball and ice cold beer.

    946 - 978 Franklin


  • 960 Franklin


  • I can still smell the spices when I walk by.

    Also, the name of the nearby apartment complex is Ebbets Field Apartments, not Houses. :sunny:


  • I fixed the name of the complex.

    I do find it wierd how much unused land there is around the Spice building.

    Assuming it is zoned residential, I suspect we will get some more neighbors.


  • There also used to be a BRT Consumer Park stop on what is now the Franklin Ave. Shuttle; that stop was later replaced by the Botanic Garden stop. The 1918 Malbone Street disaster was between the Consumer Park and Prospect Park stops.


  • I believe the Malbone Street wreck was right under Empire Boulevard. The street's name was changed from Malbone Street to Empire Boulevard because of the incident. (There is a stub of Malbone Street near the 71st Precinct.)

    I see from the old map posted above that there was a street that ran through what is now part of the Brooklyn Botanic Garden. I wonder what used to be there.


  • Is it just me, or do others hear a "tick, tick, tick" noise as one walks by this complex and the surrounding vacant lots?

    A "tick. tick, tick" that ends in the spices being moved to ENY and the site being converted into condos, and a lot of construction on the surrounding vacant lots.
  • Website for the spice company:


    Give the development pressure on the site, I have decided to add it to the sites that I watch closely:

  • So that old cement building just past the spice building used to be a train platform? I always wondered.
  • whynot_31 said:

    is it just me, or do others hear a "tick, tick, tick" noise as one walks by this complex and the surrounding vacant lots?A "tick. tick, tick" that ends in the spices being moved to ENY and the site being converted into condos, and a lot of construction on the surrounding vacant lots.



    I heard this evening that this site has been sold. No word yet on who purchased this lot; I don't think that info is of public record yet.

    Maybe another set of 20+ story apartment buildings can be constructed?

  • Yes.

    That is huge, but not surprising news.    One of the sites with paid staff (Curbed, Brownstoner, Real Deal, etc) will likely break the news of who bought it sometime soon.

    Here's a little about R7A.

    So, we won't get anything taller than the building in the photos (see above link) unless affordable housing is included.   ...only as a result of including affordable units, were the Tivoli and Ebbets Field buildings able to be so tall.   
  • BTW, I suspect and hope that some of the large brick buildings survive. They are good looking enough that I suspect people will pay to live in them, and could pretty easily be made into residential.
  • Franklin Avenue won't smell like spices anymore. 
  • I assume it is a profitable business, and will relocate elsewhere.

    I am interested in whether the new owner bought the whole business, or just the buildings and the land.

    If they just bought the B and L, I assume a lease was written to allow the business time to move.

    If they bought the whole business, the operation could be closed, the employees left without jobs, and customers with one less spice supplier.

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