greenwood not landmarked? — Brooklynian

Comments

  • That article was written after the LPC decided to de-calendar a bunch of properties that were being considered for landmarking.

    The LPC has since re-calendared them.

    The cemetery has other protections from development already in place (among them a board of directors, covenants, and zoning).

    ...but the LPC waffling did serve as good click bait by Brooklyn Magazine.
  • If you're talking about Green-wood Cemetery -- and I'm not altogether sure that you are -- I have it on good authority as recently as today that the Cemetery has been so marked and protected.

    Russell

  • Besides, who's going to do anything to change a cemetery.
  • A few forlorn graves relocated and you can have an acre of realstate with views to build a tower.
  • edited December 2014
    Given the age to the earth, there is likely a body of some kind rotting underneath where we stand at any given moment.

    How long should we dedicate a space to the average dead human?

    200 hundred years?
  • Are grave yards dedicated or does the importance of the personage or symbolism of group buried determine the value?  I assumed graveyards were for profit and social stability.
  • edited December 2014
    The city refers to them as "Open Space as Recreation"

    http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/html/landusefacts/landusefactshome.shtml

    So, even if the deceased lived as paupers, it would be difficult to tear out the tombstones and go directly to building condos on them.

    Once enough time passes, someone might be able to create a park or a public golf course there.

    ...then, build condos or office towers.
  • Because if the grave is old enough and it's dug up it's called "archeology." If it's not that old it's called "grave robbing" and it's a felony. Go figure.
  • http://www.brooklynian.com/discussion/44067/slave-graveyard-on-dean-street#Item_4

    What would this be called? I forgot I started this thread long ago. It is curiously related.
  • I would call that "ensuring that the US remembers the ugly parts of its past, not just Betsy Ross and the Liberty Bell".
  • Given the age to the earth, there is likely a body of some kind rotting underneath where we stand at any given moment.

    How long should we dedicate a space to the average dead human?

    200 hundred years?


    For   many years I subscribed to Yankee  magazine and recall numerous photos of children playing over the graves of their forefathers.  In saying this I  mean no disrespect to anyone. But it just occurred to me that photos like that have been posted in that magazine several times over the years.
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