De Blasio, Heastie meet to discuss rent reform...in Ebbets Field Apartments - Brooklynian

De Blasio, Heastie meet to discuss rent reform...in Ebbets Field Apartments

Article 1: De Blasio, Heastie meet to discuss rent reform: http://www.capitalnewyork.com/article/city-hall/2015/02/8561851/de-blasio-heastie-meet-discuss-rent-reform
Article 2: De Blasio: Rundown Ebbetts Field Apartments worth saving: http://www.newsday.com/news/new-york/bill-de-blasio-nyc-mayor-says-rundown-ebbetts-field-apartments-worth-saving-1.9917201


"They briefly addressed reporters, along with Assemblyman Walter Mosley, inside the lobby of the Ebbets Field Apartments on Bedford Avenue.

De Blasio said the apartment complex has long represented the "kind of housing available to working people, kind of housing that keeps New York City a place for everyone, keeps it an economically diverse place."

Comments

  • edited February 2015
    Article 3:
    http://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/02/09/nyregion/new-york-speaker-calls-stronger-rent-laws-his-top-priority.html

    Capital NY wrote:
    "This is going on too long," she added, saying she has lived in a one-bedroom apartment for nearly four decades and now pays more than $900 a month.Another tenant, Beverly Newsome, said she spoke with the mayor about the need for better legal representation for tenants."There are very intelligent management companies who are very good at getting those of us who have been in our apartments 10, 15, 20 years, getting us caught up in a situation so that they can take advantage of the market value of moving new tenants in," Newsome told reporters after she met with de Blasio.

    @Mugofmead111 -

    Do you know how much new tenants being charged for a typical one bedroom in the complex?  
    Do you know if the apartments are being renovated when they become vacant?

    As time goes on,  I expect the new tenants to become increasingly identifiable from the long term ones not just in terms of occupations and income (ie "economic diversity"), but also in terms of racial diversity.   

    -Because the complex is so large, my sense is that vast majority of tenants only vaguely know each other.   
    -Because the complex is presently so segregated (I believe over 90% are black), I expect hue will be among the easiest factors to use to determine whether a tenant is new. 

    ...De Blasio only touches at the "not so fun" times that likely lay ahead.

  • @whynot_31 - I don't know how much new tenants are paying.

    I've been told that vacant apartments do get renovated. 

    The statement that the vast majority of the tenants don't know each other that well is true. There are some long-term tenants who are still around who know each other.

    There are some new tenants who are becoming more diverse. They're not seen at tenants meeting so I don't know what their deal is. 

    Re:"Because the complex is presently so segregated (I believe over 90% are black)"
    Among the black tenants, there is a significant segment of the population who are of Caribbean descent, and a growing contingent from Africa. Then there are blacks who are neither (just plain old African-American).
  • edited February 2015
    While there are very real differences among the existing groups, a new resident with recent ties to Africa is not as likely to be as easily noticed as someone who visibly meets the stereotype of being from Ireland.

    As a result, "easiest" will not necessarily equal "most accurate".

    I have been told that the wait list for the apartments is quite long. Up to 5 years?

    ...presumably, the newbies of all varieties are being drawn fom this list?

    Now that the complex is no longer bound to Mitchell Lama Rental regulations, is management able to stray from the list?

    I also assume that new people are allowed onto the list regardless of their income. Is that correct?
  • I don't know about a waitlist to get into the complex, but I suspect the president of the tenants association would have an idea. :)

    Ebbets Field left the Mitchell-Lama program years ago, by the way.  
  • edited February 2015
    Yes, I was under the impression that when it left ML, everyone that was on the waitlist kept their spot. So, the folks who got on the list back when it was a part of ML, had to meet income requirements.

    However, now that the complex is post - ML, people can get onto the list without meeting such requirements.

    I believe management is still working its way thru the ML part of the list.

    I'd be interested in how long managment believes it will take to get thru "them", to the post-ML applicants.

    Given housing demand in Brooklyn, I expect the post-ML applicants to have higher incomes.

    Because of how such things are distributed in the US and Brooklyn, I have found that when folks have different incomes, there are often differences that correlate not just to hue, but also level of education, and a wealth of other factors.

  • Yes, I was under the impression that when it left, everyone that was on the waitlist kept their spot. So, the folks who got on the list back when it was a part of ML, had to meet income requirements.

    However, post - ML, people can get onto the list without meeting such requirements.  
    This is interesting. I didn't know this about a wait list.

  • edited February 2015
    I am merely under this impression; I "believe" this is how it works when a building transitions from ML.

    And, I believe this is part of why firms managing ML buildings are allowed to close their wait lists years before they actually age out of the program.

    Ebbets was completed in 1962: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ebbets_Field

    As a result of being built before 1974, Ebbets' owners must abide by Rent Stabilization rules now that they have left ML: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitchell-Lama_Housing_Program

    However -unless DeBlasio and Heastie can come up with ongoing $, rules and/or incentives- many of the units could become significantly more expensive even though they are under RS.

    Their appearance in the lobby yesterday was part of the process to lobby for said cash, rules and incentives, and stems from forces that will soon cause more of the building to be more marketable. (ahem, re-zoning?)

    Or, there may presently be incentives and rules in place that will soon expire. (All of RS could in theory expire in June, but an outright repeal of the rules seems highly unlikely to me)

    Regardless, I wonder if the managment company has set a clear goal for them to achieve.

    If DeBlasio and Heastie are successful in reaching said goals, they will not only be able to prevent the displacement of the present tenants, but also be able to meet with managment in a setting nicer than the Ebbets Field lobby.
  • edited April 2015
    @mugofmead111 -

    Some people are kicking around how new affordable housing could be built as ML rentals, but are trying to figure out a way that the housing could be required to remain affordable for longer, yet still be profitable enough to developers that it is created.

    As I read through this article on the efforts, I completely expected it to mentioned Ebbets Field, but instead it speaks only in generalities: http://www.cityandstateny.com/2/politics/new-york-city/reinventing-mitchell-lama.html#.VTTU-aW9tg0

    On a related note, fuel costs were very low this past winter, and it would not surprise me if the landlords received a very small (or zero) overall increase for RS apartments: http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2015/04/19/rent_freeze_looks_likely_as_operating_costs_languish.php

    A rent freeze may or may not be good news for tenants. The managing agents of large complexes (such as Ebbets Field) have the responsibilty of creating a decent return for the owners. If they don't, they will eventually be out of a job.

    One way or another, people try to make their bosses happy to keep their jobs.
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