CB4, private meetings and liquor licenses. Is this how CB's are run? - Brooklynian

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

CB4, private meetings and liquor licenses. Is this how CB's are run?

http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20150520/bushwick/community-board-revives-illegal-closed-door-liquor-license-meetings

DNAInfo is upset that liquor license hearings happen behind closed doors.  

Why would CB meetings be private?  What sort of shenanigans might be going on here?

..and what influence to CB's have anyway, when it comes to liquor licenses?  I thought it was more of an advisory role?

Comments

  • edited May 2015
    This sounds hell of sketchy if not flat out illegal. It seems like CBs must have a compelling reason other than flat out corruption to hold closed meetings. There have been so many shenanigans involving and liqour permits that this is certainly not on the level.

    My understanding is that CBs can make suggestions to the state liqour commission and request bars limit their hours but have little actual power. They are usually used by NIMBYs to instruct change or to remove bars that displease them. I'm unsure if going before them is legally required for those who seek a permit.
  • edited May 2015
    This article does not appear to pertain to the issuance of new licenses.    It instead appears to refer to a Public Safety Mtg held at (and in conjunction with) the 83rd Pct.  

    At such meetings, the members of the CB and the Pct could ask a bar owner to respond to concerns in a non-public setting that allowed off the record conversations.

    Then, they could have a meeting the public (and reporters) are welcome to attend.   The public could scream, shout, make intelligent statements, etc.    After said mtg.,  the CB could decide whether to not support the renewal of the lic or to pursue filing a complaint with the NYS SLA while the lic was active.

    To summarize:   The public rarely has the right to be a part of every part of every conversation.   The public often has the right to be a part of many conversations. 

    ...but reporters want more access.

Sign In or Register to comment.