Islanders getting voted back onto their island. - Brooklynian

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Islanders getting voted back onto their island.

There's no shortage of opinions on whether or not a sports stadium would thrive in brownstone brooklyn.  But one school of thought that I always felt was missing was around this question:  How many new brooklyn transplants care about sports? And does that amount to a factor that matters.  

When the Islanders moved in, I felt the reaction around me was "Oh cool.  A new thing in the neighborhood.  Maybe I'll find out what a hockey game looks like".  But I don't hear much, if anything about them now.    Is it possible that our capacity for sports excitement was over anticipated?  From where I stand, it's sure not the days of the brooklyn dodgers any more. 


https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20170131/prospect-heights/new-york-islanders-barclays-center-deal-ending?utm_source=Crown+Heights+&+Prospect+Heights&utm_campaign=9d4cf4a8be-Mailchimp-NYC&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c1fa904288-9d4cf4a8be-132221577

Comments

  • It's not that Brooklynites don't love sports. They love the Yankees and maybe even the Mets. It's just that not a whole lot of people love hockey. The Islanders didn't have that great attendance even when they were out in Nassau. It's like women's basketball. Doesn't mean that if you play it there will be spectators in the stands to watch.
  • The Islanders move was predicated on Long Island fans who have followed the team for decades following them to their new home, technically still on Long Island.

    The problem is Barclays Center is not fitted for hockey.

    Nor is the cologne-scented Barclays a natural home for hockey fans, much less Islanders fans.

    It was a bad fit from the start. Islanders will likely seek a home near Citi Field, then consider a move to another city, possibly a Canadian city.
  • I wouldn't say that they are getting voted out.  I don't feel a ton of enthusiasm for them either though.  Honestly, the Islanders just aren't a particularly interesting franchise to the average sports fan.  They have been very mediocre since the late 80's.  

    However, one and a half years isn't really fair to evaluate a team that has relocated.  Their first season in the new arena was actually a huge success on the ice, winning their first playoff series in 23 years (!).  Relocating and only losing a couple thousand fans per game really isn't that bad.  

    Also, I wouldn't compare the NHL with the WNBA.  The NHL draws almost double the attendance per game (even with 30 teams, some in small markets like Columbus and Ottawa) than the WNBA.  The Islanders are below average and still draw more than 4K greater per game than the Liberty (who are above average for the WNBA).  
  • Barclays is in the position where it can book venues even MORE profitable than hockey games.

    ...which likely means events that sell more tickets, and are higher priced.

    Events in which it will get a greater share of the profits...
  • Is there a suitable venue in that area already?  Or they would build and then relocate farther away later?  
    The Islanders move was predicated on Long Island fans who have followed the team for decades following them to their new home, technically still on Long Island.

    The problem is Barclays Center is not fitted for hockey.

    Nor is the cologne-scented Barclays a natural home for hockey fans, much less Islanders fans.

    It was a bad fit from the start. Islanders will likely seek a home near Citi Field, then consider a move to another city, possibly a Canadian city.

  • The Islanders moved to Barclays because the town of Hempstead would not let former owner Charles Wang redevelop the coliseum and the area around it the way he wanted. He sold the team and since the coliseum was closed for redevelopment the Islanders had to go somewhere. And losing a couple thousand fans a game is quite a lot when you only get about 10,000 to begin with. As for the WNBA....I've been to a Liberty game. The rules are non-sensical, they stop every few minutes for some kind of interaction with the fans and to true basketball fans there's really not a lot to go see. The wife and I decided we would never go back and she's a pretty big sports fan. As for the NHL drawing double the attendance of the WNBA it's still not enough to cover costs and salaries. Even now, the owners of the Islanders are looking to build a stadium either near Belmont or Citifield. Not rushing back to the coliseum so quickly.
  • edited February 2
    They would build a new arena.

    The remodeled Coliseum in Nassau is not large enough for an NHL team.

    dac545 said:
    Is there a suitable venue in that area already?  Or they would build and then relocate farther away later?  



  • Also, a lot of the Islanders fan base is made up of folks who left Brooklyn and Queens in the late 70's and 80's and still think of the city as being dangerous and scary. The team was betting that they would come once or twice to try it out and would get hooked. I don't know that it actually came to be. From what I can see, Isles fans that work or live in the city do make the trek. LI fans? I don't see them coming here in droves. Certainly folks that may live close to the RR make the trek, but its nothing like the number of people you see attending Knicks, Nets or Rangers games. And I see very little in the way of local spillover (dinner or drinks at local establishments before or after games).
  • The Islanders move was predicated on Long Island fans who have followed the team for decades following them to their new home, technically still on Long Island.

    The problem is Barclays Center is not fitted for hockey.

    Nor is the cologne-scented Barclays a natural home for hockey fans, much less Islanders fans.

    It was a bad fit from the start. Islanders will likely seek a home near Citi Field, then consider a move to another city, possibly a Canadian city.




    I just did a Google search and found that there were several articles which confirm that BC is not an ideal venue for hockey and that this has impacted the attendance numbers.  Still, it's a good bet that attendance would climb significantly  if NYI management put together a winning team that would bring home the Stanley Cup. One can only hope ...
  • Went to a couple of games when my team was visiting, both Sunday night games. The Islanders fans I spoke with said that for those who live and work in LI it's hard to make weeknight games. As someone else mentioned there is also something of a "the city is dangerous" attitude among the largely blue collar LI fanbase.

    The original arena design called for basketball and hockey, but was scrapped due to project estimates and replaced with a basketball only design. As such:

    - A large number of seats have obstructed views, which leads to unsold seats and further depresses attendance.

    - The ice is terrible. The ice making system uses PVC pipe (every other NHL arena uses steel), which does not get cold enough and causes problems when it's warm or humid. Players cite it as the worst in the league (for context there are teams in Arizona and Florida) and a safety issue.

    Barclays Center management does not want to fix these problems due to cost, both the construction costs and lost revenue from closing down over the summer.
  • Ratner's team's failure to build an arena that could suit both hockey and basketball is a major oversight, especially when you consider the Islanders were probably considering a move from Nassau when ground broke on Barclays Center.

    Time will tell if the adjacent and surrounding construction will fare better.
Sign In or Register to comment.