Safety/thoughts about Ocean b/w Albemarle Bev? — Brooklynian

Safety/thoughts about Ocean b/w Albemarle Bev?

Hi there,

I'd love to hear anyone's thoughts on this neighborhood in terms of safety, racial/gentrification tension, or general advice for me: a young white woman who's considering moving to Regent Place by myself (this is off Ocean Ave. between Albemarle & Beverly).

The building I'm looking at self-identifies as "in transition," and while I'm aware that this means getting what the management feels are so-called undesirables out and replacing them with people like me, I wonder how I would be perceived by my neighbors and whether I would feel safe and comfortable being one of "those people."

Actually, I already am one of those people in Crown Heights, but in a quieter, more neighborhoody, and much less "in transition" neighborhood. So I'm fine with being the racial minority and accustomed to stares, etc.

But since I'm unfamiliar with this area, I wonder if any of you can tell me your thoughts? Specifically if you were me, would you feel okay moving there on your own?

Thanks in advance.

Comments

  • Well, I know it's getting better, it's not really my favorite stretch of Ocean Ave. Still kind of sketchy IMO, but really, not much there so no reason for people to be hanging out late. As long as you are close enough to the subway it's probably OK. However, the buildings between Albermarle and Beverly on the east side of the Q train remind me of the Bronx which is never a good thing.
  • Subject: Re: Safety/thoughts about Ocean b/w Albemarle & Bev?

    bridcro wrote: Hi there,

    I'd love to hear anyone's thoughts on this neighborhood in terms of safety, racial/gentrification tension, or general advice for me: a young white woman who's considering moving to Regent Place by myself (this is off Ocean Ave. between Albemarle & Beverly).

    The building I'm looking at self-identifies as "in transition," and while I'm aware that this means getting what the management feels are so-called undesirables out and replacing them with people like me, I wonder how I would be perceived by my neighbors and whether I would feel safe and comfortable being one of "those people."

    Actually, I already am one of those people in Crown Heights, but in a quieter, more neighborhoody, and much less "in transition" neighborhood. So I'm fine with being the racial minority and accustomed to stares, etc.

    But since I'm unfamiliar with this area, I wonder if any of you can tell me your thoughts? Specifically if you were me, would you feel okay moving there on your own?

    Thanks in advance.

    Okay, I am not meaning to start the beginning of a very contentious thread, but why put yourself in a situation where you have to gauge whether " I would feel safe and comfortable being one of "those people." ie: "a young white woman" who is considering moving in gentrifying neighborhood full of possible "racial" and you forgot to mention economic "tension".

    Why not find several roommates and stay in an area where you wouldn't have to ask those kinds of questions? ie “a nice white area”? If it’s a money issue, just get more roommates.

    The very fact that you ARE asking the questions about safety and racial tension is because you are part of the problem of gentrification, class and racial tension. You even say in your post that you are already "one of those people" in Crown Heights. ie young white gentrifies, worried about how close a neighborhood comes to changing over into something where you feel safe enough to walk through let alone actually hang out in. Gentrifies are people with little or no affiliation/connection with the neighborhood they chose to live in other than sleeping and receiving mail.
    gentrifiers are often the people who would rather haul bags from whole foods into their neighborhood than shop at the local store, support the local economy and urge that store owner through patronage and conversation to stock more vegetables. Gentrifiers take over places, they don't actually help the local people improve anything.


    Most people who are active in their communities, and visit the local hangouts, Laundromats and participate in community board actions, become familiar with the locals end up being left alone, despite their differing races. Just look at the local Chinese food store owners. Yes there have been situations where those stores have been robbed, but the VAST MAJORITY of them (in most low income neighborhoods they are on every block), those Chinese stores and their owners are accepted and not bothered. Same goes for the Dominican hair salons.
  • I couldn't agree with you more, teaspoon of kisses. Though funnily enough, I'm a regular at my local Dominican hair salon and will be so sad to lose it when I have to move to my next gentrification site.

    I wish I could have roommates but the truth is, I don't really like people. What if I ended up with a roommate like you, for example? This sad fact is probably because I'm a grumpy social worker, which is another reason why I can't afford the white places and wouldn't want to.

    So thank you for the talking points on inequity, especially salient from "The Psychologist(!)," but unfortunately this is not a helpful answer.

    And since it was my question after all...anyone else?
  • play nice!
  • bridcro wrote: I couldn't agree with you more, teaspoon of kisses. Though funnily enough, I'm a regular at my local Dominican hair salon and will be so sad to lose it when I have to move to my next gentrification site.

    I wish I could have roommates but the truth is, I don't really like people. What if I ended up with a roommate like you, for example? This sad fact is probably because I'm a grumpy social worker, which is another reason why I can't afford the white places and wouldn't want to.

    So thank you for the talking points on inequity, especially salient from "The Psychologist(!)," but unfortunately this is not a helpful answer.

    And since it was my question after all...anyone else?
    I happen to live alone, because I can afford it. I happen to live in a neighborhood that I don't have to ask questions about because I can afford it. If those aren't options for you, then you may have to make some tough choices. It sounded to me from the way you phrased your questions that you would feel more comfortable in a white neighborhood, and not be "one of those people" as you claimed to be in your post. I mean your question in a nutshell is the following:


    young white woman inquiring about the safety of a neighborhood that you implied by your writings is not a white neighborhood

    I offered you a solution to your problem. Get a bunch of people to put your pennies together to rent a place in a neighborhood that you are not "scared of" or “worried about”.

    I mean do you WANT to be "one of those people" that you talked about ie "gentrifiers". You know that gentrifiers are not held in high esteem because of what I said above. Is that how you see yourself? Are you "one of those people", not of the neighborhood, but who just happens to sleep there at night?

    Correct me if I am wrong, but this is what you implied in your writings.

    I was just offering a solution. No need for personal attacks on whether I would make a good roommate.

    You after all were the one who dropped the gauntlet by using terms such as
    "young white woman"
    "one of those people"
    "safety"
    "undesirables"
    "people like me"
    and “neighborhood in transitioning”


    Transitioning from what? The ghetto? From being undesirable? That is a place where people called home, before you even looked at it. What are people "like you" versus people like "them"??
    Do you think Black, Latino or Asian women who may live there already don't get mugged or worry about safety? What makes you especially a target as a “young white woman”. If you were geriatric would that make things easier and prevent you from feeling "unsafe"?

    You are a social worker ..................
    :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: ...................

    I will resist ALL comments:
    I won’t fill my replies with personal attacks about whether you make a good roommate, or social worker, because I think everyone can see by your own writings just what sort of person you are
  • But remember, there's nothing wrong with being not of the neighborhood, but just someone who happens to sleep there at night.
  • Very big of you, teaspoon.
  • MeredithB wrote: But remember, there's nothing wrong with being not of the neighborhood, but just someone who happens to sleep there at night.

    You are right

    There is nothing wrong with not wanting to assoicate with the people who live in your neighborhood, but you have to be prepared to be viewed by the people who live in that neighborhood as "someone not from the neighborhood" or worthy of the same warmth and possibly consideration as someone who IS or wants to be a part of the neighborhood.

    I know my neighbors speak to and look out for me, cause I speak to associate and look out for them, just sayin.
  • Shoot, most of my neighbors speak to me and look out for me until I get outside of my building then I'm anonymous except to the bodega and liquor store owners.
  • I opted to move a little further down Ocean Avenue, near Newkirk. Granted I bought my place. I know it's a few train stops further but it's beautiful, safe, and feels like a real neighborhood.
  • My girlfriend and I lived on Ocean Ave at the corner of Regent Place last year and we wouldn't recommend it. Ocean Ave is fine, but Regent Place is super sketchy. Stop and Shop off Flatbush Ave was the closest grocery store, so we walked down Regent a lot. She always felt extremely unsafe walking down Regent at night. Our first week we were coming back from the store and there were a few cop vans parked on Regent with their lights on and like 15 cops all over the street. It looked like they were preparing for some sort of riot. Definitely not a good first impression. Always super shady, unfriendly (to us) people on those 2 blocks. If safety is any concern to you, don't do it. Move closer to the train. The less you have to walk down Beverley (on the east side of the tracks), the better.
  • Thanks so much, mixer and vegan and Meredith. This is really helpful.
  • flatbushvegan wrote: My girlfriend and I lived on Ocean Ave at the corner of Regent Place last year and we wouldn't recommend it. Ocean Ave is fine, but Regent Place is super sketchy. Stop and Shop off Flatbush Ave was the closest grocery store, so we walked down Regent a lot. She always felt extremely unsafe walking down Regent at night. Our first week we were coming back from the store and there were a few cop vans parked on Regent with their lights on and like 15 cops all over the street. It looked like they were preparing for some sort of riot. Definitely not a good first impression. Always super shady, unfriendly (to us) people on those 2 blocks. If safety is any concern to you, don't do it. Move closer to the train. The less you have to walk down Beverley (on the east side of the tracks), the better.
    I wonder if in the time since you've left its gotten better? My g/f recently moved into Ocean, a block north of Regent, and hasnt mentioned anything sketchy--except for the one "Midwestern" dude upstairs who was obviously "on something." She has gotten mixed reaction for the locals, but has made some acquaintances in the building.

    To the OP: I would definitely say this: avoid Ocean and Church up to the Park. If you want a want that you can walk around at 3am without feeling threatened, I would suggest Midwood.
  • ACTUALLY, ACCORDING TO CRIME STATISTICS, WHITE PEOPLE AND WHITE WOMEN ARE TARGETS OF BLACK CRIMINALS... So yeah, white people in that area would be more fucking likely to be a target.

    Dedicated to the PC guy who wonders, "What makes you think you'd be more likely to get mugged than a black/asian/latino?"

    Hmmm, maybe because many blacks are racist and fraudently blame/resent whites for slavery, despite the fact 90% of us are not descended from slave-owners.
  • Hey check out this crime stats report
    http://projects.nytimes.com/crime/homicides/map
    I haven't check it out for your neighborhood- but where I live in Crown Heights the statistics are quite clear that most crime is black on black crime and usually the perp knows the victim. ( in re-edit I checked your potential neighborhood and it clearly shows that crime is black on black)

    I dont know where "e" gets her stats, but if you check her previous posts you will know where she is coming from.

    Also Guys tend to get mugged more that women because they are perceived as carrying more cash, and then there is no glamor in mugging women.

    I moved from Carrol gardens to the Patio Gardens 580=590 Flatbush and was concerned about crime because I had never lived in a neighborhood like that. My experience was good. I loved the apartment. I said hello or nodded to more people . White yuppies tend to keep to themselves and do not agknowlendge others. That is construed as kind of rude. this isn;t manhattan.

    You get what you give. People can look scary or mean, but you smile and respect people and they will smile and respect you back.

    I met some nice people and some jerks.
  • Thoughts about Ocean Ave between Cortelyou and Dorchester? Is is sketchier or less sketchy than further up near the park?

    Thanks!
  • this is really interesting...If the neighborhoods are sketchy,why not be a part of the solution...I would not live in a neighborhood just because the crime is mainly black on black. This statement really makes me wonder. So its ok to live in a bad neighborhood as long as the crime is amongst a different ethnicity or race....Be careful how you phrase things, you may be misunderstood.....
  • If you decide to move to the neighborhood please get in touch as we will sort of be neighbors.

    I recently had a similar post about moving to Flatbush and Linden - a few blocks away. I got a similar mix of responses, some very dire about the dangers of the neighborhood. I am moving to that neighborhood because I want to shop for cheap corner produce and comb through job lot stores - things I can no longer do in the slope.

    My new apartment also has a fabric store around the corner - I have a sewing business and do costumes - and a library across the street. I do have a car though I will more likely be dragging boxes from Costco than bags Whole Foods. I was smitten by a real 2 BR in a prewar bldg, with closets and parquet floors and massive square footage for $1250 (the vestibule is 8 x 10 and has a closet!) after 20 years of fflrthru living with 9 ' wide rooms.

    We'll see if the neighborhood lives up to its reputation. I lived in Baltimore in '03-'05 in a neighborhood where I passed a police action at least three times a week commuting to work, and every corner had police cameras. The thing that made that area scary was that the streets were empty - no pedestrians at all.

    When I first lived at 5th and 5th in the slope there were drug dealers on my corner. When a gun toting crazy man with the wrong address came at me screaming threats the corner dealers chased the guy off then helped the police track him down. We have to have where we can afford to live. Brooklyn has always been more integrated than many cities. I am hoping I just add an additional shade to the rainbow of my new nabe.
  • If you decide to move to the neighborhood please get in touch as we will sort of be neighbors.

    I recently had a similar post about moving to Flatbush and Linden - a few blocks away. I got a similar mix of responses, some very dire about the dangers of the neighborhood. I am moving to that neighborhood because I want to shop for cheap corner produce and comb through job lot stores - things I can no longer do in the slope.

    My new apartment also has a fabric store around the corner - I have a sewing business and do costumes - and a library across the street. I do have a car though I will more likely be dragging boxes from Costco than bags Whole Foods. I was smitten by a real 2 BR in a prewar bldg, with closets and parquet floors and massive square footage for $1250 (the vestibule is 8 x 10 and has a closet!) after 20 years of fflrthru living with 9 ' wide rooms.

    We'll see if the neighborhood lives up to its reputation. I lived in Baltimore in '03-'05 in a neighborhood where I passed a police action at least three times a week commuting to work, and every corner had police cameras. The thing that made that area scary was that the streets were empty - no pedestrians at all.

    When I first lived at 5th and 5th in the slope there were drug dealers on my corner. When a gun toting crazy man with the wrong address came at me screaming threats the corner dealers chased the guy off then helped the police track him down. We have to have where we can afford to live. Brooklyn has always been more integrated than many cities. I am hoping I just add an additional shade to the rainbow of my new nabe.
  • good for you ProPa! Best wishes!
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