Read Any Good Books Lately?
  • So, I've been tearing through books like crazy while cooped up. Anybody have any suggestions? I'm generally a fiction girl (trade paperback is my favorite size).......nothing too fluffy (generally not into chick lit).

    Some things I've read and enjoyed lately:

    City of Thieves - David Benioff
    Skeletons at the Feast- Chris Bohjalian


    Did not enjoy so much:

    Olive Kitteridge


    I don't generally tend to like some of the authors who seem to crank out books.

    thanks :)
  • Anything by John Irving, Wally Lamb, or Anne Tyler....also give our Brooklyn boy, Pete Hamill's fiction a try. I am reading Hamill's Forever again, great novel that includes a ton of NYC history.
  • House of Leaves by Mark z. Danielewski is crazy, dizzying, rambling, genre-bending, brilliant.

    the sheer level of brain power required to write this book is dumbfounding. I do not hesitate at all to call Danielewski a genius.
  • I liked:
    The Alienist - Caleb Carr, did not like the sequel.
    The Amazing Adventures of Cavalier & Clay (sp?) - Micheal Chabon - at least 3/4 of it.
    The Yiddish Policeman's Union, also Chabon.
    A Confederacy of Dunces - classic.
    Fortress of Solitude - a Brooklyn story

    Drawing a blank, I'll try to think of more.
  • Don't read the Edgar Sawtell (or something like that) book. Ugh.

    If you can find them, the two Amanada Filipachi books I've read so far are weird page-turners. I'm still not sure I like them, but I would read them again just b/c of the experience. I read Vapor and Nude Men.
  • Superclam wrote: I liked:
    The Alienist - Caleb Carr, did not like the sequel.
    The Amazing Adventures of Cavalier & Clay (sp?) - Micheal Chabon - at least 3/4 of it.
    The Yiddish Policeman's Union, also Chabon.
    A Confederacy of Dunces - classic.
    Fortress of Solitude - a Brooklyn story

    Drawing a blank, I'll try to think of more.


    thanks, superclam.

    I liked Alienist, agree about C&C, Yiddish was ok, I hated Dunces and Fortress was pretty good. So, nothing new here for me :-)
  • also just finished disgrace by jm coetzee.

    very good. easy read. would probably take you a day.
  • Have you read Pattern Recognition by Gibson? Or Accelerando by Charles Stross?
  • Carnivore wrote: Have you read Pattern Recognition by Gibson? Or Accelerando by Charles Stross?


    Nope. I'll check them out online (and the Coetzee). Thanks!
  • Flexichick wrote: [quote=Superclam]I liked:
    The Alienist - Caleb Carr, did not like the sequel.
    The Amazing Adventures of Cavalier & Clay (sp?) - Micheal Chabon - at least 3/4 of it.
    The Yiddish Policeman's Union, also Chabon.
    A Confederacy of Dunces - classic.
    Fortress of Solitude - a Brooklyn story

    Drawing a blank, I'll try to think of more.


    thanks, superclam.

    I liked Alienist, agree about C&C, Yiddish was ok, I hated Dunces and Fortress was pretty good. So, nothing new here for me :-)

    Well, someone's a busy reader!!
    Hated Dunces??? Really??
    I've never met anyone who's said that before.
  • I think it's because she's a communiss.
  • Well, I really don't get what the hoopla about Dunces was all about. I struggled to finish it!

    (yes, I'm a busy reader!)
  • She should be impaled upon the member of a particularly large stallion.
  • I'm been struggling to read "Neuromancer". I just can't get into it; I tried twice.
    I also tried reading the whole "Lord of the Rings" trilogy, and can't get past page 3. Just not feeling it.
    Harry Potter is like Doritos for me.

    Did you read "The Glass Castle?"
    Not fiction, but I really liked it.
  • I haven't read Neuromancer....Lord of the Rings is not my thing - book or movie....I'm not into any type of mystical, fantasy, sci-fi, etc.

    I haven't read Harry Potter, although I do know a lot of adults who really enjoyed the series.

    I never read Glass Castle.....
  • nonhipoldbklynchick wrote: Anything by John Irving, Wally Lamb, or Anne Tyler....also give our Brooklyn boy, Pete Hamill's fiction a try. I am reading Hamill's Forever again, great novel that includes a ton of NYC history.


    thanks, nonhip....

    I generally like John Irving, but his last book or two have been crap. I read Wally Lamb, but his newest is not out in paperback yet. Anne Tyler is hit or miss for me...never read Hamill
  • Judging from what you've said, you might enjoy The Glass Castle. It's about a girl who grew up very poor & traveled around the US because her father was a little kooky.

    As you can tell, I'll never be a literary critic, but the book was good.
  • Oh, Glass Castle is a must. Great story, written very well.

    I passed it on to several family members, all with different tastes in books and all loved it. It opens, "I was sitting in a taxi, wondering if I had overdressed for the evening, when I looked out the window and saw Mom rooting through a dumpster."
  • The Other Side of Paradise, a memoir
    by Staceyann Chin
    http://www.staceyannchin.com/

    (go brooklyn!)
  • I went to Africa a year and a half ago and I can't get enough of African memoirs. Here are 2 (the first is an easier read but no less moving or thoughtful than the second):

    1. Peter Godwin - When an Alligator Eats the Sun:
    It got 5 out of 5 stars on Amazon (for whatever that's worth). It's very readable (don't let the review below steer you away from it as being too depressing because it is also uplifting).

    Publisher's Weekly: "In this exquisitely written, deeply moving account of the death of a father played out against the backdrop of the collapse of the southern African nation of Zimbabwe, seasoned journalist Godwin has produced a memoir that effortlessly manages to be almost unbearably personal while simultaneously laying bare the cruel regime of longstanding president Robert Mugabe."
    http://www.amazon.com/When-Crocodile-Eats-Sun-Memoir/dp/0316018716/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1247102935&sr=1-1

    2. Alexandra Fuller - "Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight"
    WARNING: the first 100 pages are a slog because she writes in the local dialect to a certain extent. I forced myself to keep reading because it won a couple of big awards. TRUST ME: It's worth it and I fell in love with her family (despite their many flaws) and was VERY sad when the book was over. 4 stars out of 5 on Amazon

    Publisher's Weekly: A classic is born in this tender, intensely moving and even delightful journey through a white African girl's childhood. Born in England and now living in Wyoming, Fuller was conceived and bred on African soil during the Rhodesian civil war (1971-1979), a world where children over five "learn[ed] how to load an FN rifle magazine, strip and clean all the guns in the house, and ultimately, shoot-to-kill."

    http://www.amazon.com/Dont-Lets-Dogs-Tonight-Childhood/dp/0375758992/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1247103160&sr=1-1

    Happy reading!
  • You may have read them already, as they're all by popular authors, but here are some I thoroughly enjoyed:
    -"Norwegian Wood"-Haruki Murakami
    -"Running with Scissors"-Augusten Burroughs
    -"The Power and the Glory"-Graham Greene
    -"Sex, Drugs and Cocoa Puffs"-Chuck Klosterman
  • I tend to read only short stories (short attention span?) and I always recommend Best American Short Stories. As far as novels go, I love, love, love The Feast of Love by Charles Baxter. When I finished it, I turned it over and reread it. I never do that.
  • This book isn't new, but it's from an author that I think lives in Brooklyn. "Wake up Sir" by Jonathan Ames. It's in the spirit of P.G. Wodehouse and has an imaginary butler named Jeeves who assists an alcoholic struggling writer who heads to Saratoga Springs to work on his novel. It's funny or at least I found it humerous.
  • Flo wrote: This book isn't new, but it's from an author that I think lives in Brooklyn. "Wake up Sir" by Jonathan Ames. It's in the spirit of P.G. Wodehouse and has an imaginary butler named Jeeves who assists an alcoholic struggling writer who heads to Saratoga Springs to work on his novel. It's funny or at least I found it humerous.


    I like Ames, and liked that book a lot. He's a strange man (I know somebody who is close friends with him), but funny.

    I've read some of his non-fiction, and when I'm in the mood for short stories (rarely), I'll read him, Burroughs (read the one suggested above) and Sedaris (I have the latest and am about 1/2 way through).

    Thanks for all of the suggestions :lol:
  • the curious incident of the dog in the night. mark haddon (excellent short)
    are you there vodka it's me chelsea. chelsea handler (silly stories)
    my horizontal life. chelsea handler (sillier stories)
    sellevision. augusten buroughs or any of his memoirs are great (all great)
    a piece of cake. cupcake brown (tear jerker)
    a confederacy of dunces. john kennedy toole (my favorite book)
    she's come undone. wally lamb (my other favorite book)

    let me know your favs!
  • I read so much (and watch so many movies) that not much of it actually sticks. I'd have to go to my shelves to remember my favorites, but some that I really like include: Blindness (Saramag), The Other Twin (Wally Lamb), Middlesex (can't remember....). Recently: Water for Elephants (?), City of Thieves (David Benioff).
  • I'm not sure the books I suggested are your style but, if so, I have them both and would be willing to lend either/both to you. PM me, if interested.
  • danielle123 wrote: I'm not sure the books I suggested are your style but, if so, I have them both and would be willing to lend either/both to you. PM me, if interested.


    Thanks, Danielle. Somebody else also recommended "When an Alligator Eats the Sun". I may end up ordering it, since I like keeping good books (even though I rarely read them twice). I appreciate the offer!
  • Yeah, I do the same - buy them and read them once (no matter how much I love them - there are too many other books to read!). I've put a moratorium on buying any more books until I read the ones I have.
  • william faulkner, tom robbins, and kurt vonnegut always keep me coming back, but they're not news to anybody. maybe a fraction of the whole, by steve toltz, or bliss or theft by peter carey. carey is pretty great, i'll read just about anything he writes. same with ian mcewan. i'd have a lot more names for you if you were more interested in short stories; it gets harder and harder for me to work my way through a novel, sadly.
  • I guess I'm one of the few who didn't like Confederacy of Dunces either.

    I like Martin Amis. Money was hilarious.
    Denis Johnson is pretty good.
    Currently reading Search for Captain Zero by Weisbecker.
    Fun surf/travel story.

    Please Kill me, This Band Could Be Your Life, and Get in the Van are all great music books.

    Maybe try the BBC top 100 list?
  • Lexie Z wrote: the curious incident of the dog in the night. mark haddon (excellent short)


    a friend of mine read this and said that she did not like it because it was written too simplistically, as though the narrator was retarded or something.

    sigh, reading comprehension fail.
  • vidro3 wrote: [quote=Lexie Z]the curious incident of the dog in the night. mark haddon (excellent short)


    a friend of mine read this and said that she did not like it because it was written too simplistically, as though the narrator was retarded or something.

    sigh, reading comprehension fail.

    oh. my. god. "fail" does not begin to describe what happened there . . .

    i lent my mother a copy of the winter of our discontent once and she told me she couldn't get into it because "it was too wordy." i said, "wha?" and she said, "i don't know, it just seems like he's using too many words." still haven't figured out what that was all about.
  • A Game of Thrones - George R.R. Martin (Part of the "Song of Ice & Fire" series)

    this series is the best one out there IMHO
  • david mitchell - number9dream (esp if you're a murikami fan), cloud atlas is amazing.
  • hasawaknow wrote: A Game of Thrones - George R.R. Martin (Part of the "Song of Ice & Fire" series)

    this series is the best one out there IMHO

    The first 3 in the series are good, but I'm finding the 4th one is totally dragging. I'm reluctant to finish it, except that I've already invested this much time in the series, and I want to find out how it ends. Also, is the 5th book ever coming out?
  • "Beat the Reaper" by Josh Bazell entertained me recently. Kind of like ER meets The Sopranos. Its about a doctor in a witness protection program.
  • Flo wrote: "Beat the Reaper" by Josh Bazell entertained me recently. Kind of like ER meets The Sopranos. Its about a doctor in a witness protection program.


    Oh, that looks good (just read about it on Amazon), but it's not out in paperback yet. I added it to my list. Thanks!
  • what about the books that the series Dexter was based on? I dunno if they are good or not but if you like the series you might want to check them out.

    and then tell me all about them.
  • Orientalism - Edaward W. Said

    Notes From Underground - Fyodor Dostoevsky

    On Thermonuclear War - Herman Kahn
  • Netherland by Joseph O'Neill - this was one of the best books I read last year, it's out in paperback now. So much of it is set in Brooklyn (Flatbush area, along with Floyd Bennett Field) and it really has a sense of place, for both Brooklyn and NYC.
  • arrbecca wrote: Netherland by Joseph O'Neill - this was one of the best books I read last year, it's out in paperback now. So much of it is set in Brooklyn (Flatbush area, along with Floyd Bennett Field) and it really has a sense of place, for both Brooklyn and NYC.


    oh yea wanted to read this
  • Netherland: it is seriously so good.
  • Netherland. I think I wanted to read this too. This is the book with cricket in it, yes?
  • Yes, cricket (but don't let that scare you away).
  • "Doghead" by Morten Ramsland
  • So, I just finished the latest Sedaris and every story I read felt very familiar. Turns out that almost all of them were published in the New Yorker. I think there were only 2-3 new stories. Don't bother if you read the New Yorker!
  • Subject: Good Books

    Latest: My Life as a Man, by Philip Roth. Hilarious.
  • Carnivore wrote: Have you read Pattern Recognition by Gibson? Or Accelerando by Charles Stross?


    Pattern Recognition was good, and I thought that Glass House was even better than Accelerando. Halting State was decent, too.

    One of my favorite reads in the last couple of years is Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell. Another that deserves similar recognition is Gene Wolfe's The Wizard Knight (two volumes). Wolfe has a knack for unfolding stories rather than creating them, and they're usually deceptively simple.

    Spin was excellent.

    Currently, I'm reading Excession, by Iain M Banks - very good so far. I'm glad that his work is seeing fresh distribution, I've been in need of a new author to read through. So far, Matter has been my least favorite, and one that I can't recommend to someone that's not a completist. The Player of Games was good and Use of Weapons was great.
  • I LOVE Iain M. Banks, and have all his books, although I haven't read Matter yet (it's on deck- I also have Halting State but haven't read it yet). The only ones I didn't like were the ones written as Iain Banks instead of Iain M. Banks (the non-SF ones). If you haven't read Against A Dark Background, Feersome Endjin, Consider Phlebas, Inversion, or The Algebraist, you should pick them up (or PM me if you want to borrow one).

    Also, if you like British space opera type Sci Fi, you should definitely check out Alistair Reynolds (I also have tons of these I could lend you).

    I haven't read those Gene Wolfe books but I like Shadow/Claw and Sword/Citadel.
  • I'm going to pimp House of Leaves again. (emphasis mine)

    Bret Easton Ellis
    A great novel. A phenomenal debut. Thrillingly alive, sublimely creepy, distressingly scary, breathtakingly intelligent -- it renders most other fiction meaningless. One can imaging Thomas Pynchon, J. G. Ballard, Stephen King, and David Foster Wallace bowing at Danielewski's feet, choking with astonishment, surprise, laughter, awe.
    —(Bret Easton Ellis)

    A rollicking Pynchonesque oddity, a Nabokovian linguistic obsession, and a Borgesian unreality. House of Leaves jumps and skips and plays with genre-wrecking abandon, postmodern panache, and an obsessively imaginative scope that absolutely shames most books on the market today.
    -San Francisco Examiner and Chronicle


    Jonathan Lethem
    This demonically brilliant book is impossible to ignore, put down, or persuasively conclude reading. In fact, when you purchase your copy you may reach a certain page and find me there, reduced in size like Vincent Price in The Fly, still trapped in the web of its malicious, beautiful pages.
    —(Jonathan Lethem, author of Motherless Brooklyn)
  • Carnivore wrote: I LOVE Iain M. Banks, and have all his books, although I haven't read Matter yet (it's on deck- I also have Halting State but haven't read it yet). The only ones I didn't like were the ones written as Iain Banks instead of Iain M. Banks (the non-SF ones). If you haven't read Against A Dark Background, Feersome Endjin, Consider Phlebas, Inversion, or The Algebraist, you should pick them up (or PM me if you want to borrow one).

    Also, if you like British space opera type Sci Fi, you should definitely check out Alistair Reynolds (I also have tons of these I could lend you).

    I haven't read those Gene Wolfe books but I like Shadow/Claw and Sword/Citadel.


    Feersome Endjin is near the top of the list (as are a few others that you've mentioned), but not yet acquired - I'll take you up on your offer in another 200 pages. I'll lend you The Knight and The Wizard in exchange.

    My opinion on Matter may have been (forgive me) a matter of perspective - I know that many Banks fans think very highly of it. It was only my second Banks/Culture novel. It may be that it's just a bad place for an early Banks reader - his unannounced jumping from thread to thread, all while trying to wow you with increasingly fantastical worlds, can be a little... perplexing.

    A few others worth checking out -

    Anything by Ursula K. LeGuin - I'm still shocked that she's not a household name.

    Orson Scott Card's Pastwatch: The Redemption of Christopher Columbus. It's been 12 years since I read it, but it's still special. For me, it's Card's best work by a good margin. Fair warning - the first 150 pages or so can be a bit of a slog.

    M. John Harrison's Light - I still can't honestly say what struck me about it, but something did... and it left a lasting impression.
  • Lush Life, by Richard Price
  • I used to love Orson Scott Card (Ender's Game is a modern classic), but his politics have turned me off so much of late that I can't bring myself to buy any more of his books. Maybe the library for the next one.
  • Yeah, two things contributed to my move away from Card - his (in-book) heavy-handedness with religion and the whole multi-book series in progress that takes so long to conclude (as in, for the author to finish writing) that you've forgotten what the hell happened five books ago... it was his Alvin Maker series that made me decide to never again start reading a series that wasn't already complete OR weren't composed of books that were sufficient stand-alone pieces.

    Oh, oh, oh! Tad Williams, Otherland - very good and very long. It's called a series, but it's really one long fucking book that's split up in to easy-to-carry volumes. If you're an avid reader, it'll take 3-6 months, but I thought that it was very much worth it.
  • The 5th R.R. Martin book "should" be out in August. Heard rumors it might be about 1,300 pages. I'm guessing it comes with shoulder straps for "easy" carrying.
  • hasawaknow wrote: The 5th R.R. Martin book "should" be out in August. Heard rumors it might be about 1,300 pages. I'm guessing it comes with shoulder straps for "easy" carrying.

    After how much this 4th book is dragging, I'm either getting the 5th one at the library or waiting for paperback.
  • I just read volumes 1- 9 of The Walking Dead comics, how's about some zombies? Or volume 1 of Hatter M: The Looking Glass Wars? Nothing but the classiest books for me!
  • If you've never read Zelazny's Amber series (starting with 9 Princes in Amber), do it ASAP. Also Lord of Light.
  • Ack! I need one more book for free Amazon shipping.

    I've read so much this summer!

    Currently reading: "Finding Nouf" (ok so far)

    Finished:

    "White Tiger" (decent)
    "House at Riverton" (crap)
    "Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" (liked it, but almost gave up on it in the beginning)
    "Skeletons at the Feast" (liked)
    "When you are Engulfed in Flames" (didn't realize that most were already published in the New Yorker and I had already read 80% of the book)
    "Cost" (eh)
    "Olive Kitteridge" (blah)
    "City of Thieves" (loved)


    I have "The Hour I First Believed" and "Netherland" in my cart. Really want to read "Beat the Reaper", but it's not out in paperback yet.

    HALP!
  • tree of smoke by denis johnson
    a natural history of the senses diane ackerman
  • 1. Peter Godwin - When an Alligator Eats the Sun:
    It got 5 out of 5 stars on Amazon (for whatever that's worth). It's very readable (don't let the review below steer you away from it as being too depressing because it is also uplifting).

    Reading this now and it's amazing!
  • ^that book is called "When a Crocodile Eats the Sun" and I guess I have a strange aversion to reading it. Not sure why, since I know a few people who liked it
  • also, Samuel Johnson is Indignant, Almost No Memory, and The End of the Story, two books of short stories and a novel, all by Lydia Davis. She is awesome.
  • I added "Shot Through the Heart".

    Thanks for all of the suggestions!
  • arrbecca wrote: Netherland: it is seriously so good.


    ack. Am reading this - about 125 pages in and not loving it. The cricket stuff is just ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ

    Does it get better?
  • I'm reading the Inspector Wexford series by Ruth Rendell. Luckily, there appears to be about 25 of them.
  • I'm reading the Inspector Wexford series by Ruth Rendell. Luckily, there appears to be about 25 of them.
  • The Dream Hunters Sandman book 11 by Neil Gaiman

    snooze

    The End of History and the Last Man by Francis Fukuyama

    bore

    Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions About Uncertain Democracies by Philippe C. Schmitter, and Lawrence Whitehead

    eh, this was review of an old gradschool book. i decided to skim it before i sold it online.

    Portraits of American Politics by Bruce Allen Murphy

    actually kinda interesting. it's a collection of essays by various authors and political observers about important periods, institutions, or people in the history of american politics. they're short and easy to read , not academic or didactic, and often give you new insight.
  • The Dream Hunters Sandman book 11 by Neil Gaiman

    snooze

    The End of History and the Last Man by Francis Fukuyama

    bore

    Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions About Uncertain Democracies by Philippe C. Schmitter, and Lawrence Whitehead

    eh, this was review of an old gradschool book. i decided to skim it before i sold it online.

    Portraits of American Politics by Bruce Allen Murphy

    actually kinda interesting. it's a collection of essays by various authors and political observers about important periods, institutions, or people in the history of american politics. they're short and easy to read , not academic or didactic, and often give you new insight.
  • Motherless Brooklyn
    Brideshead Revisited
  • mr. met wrote: Motherless Brooklyn
    Brideshead Revisited


    I second Motherless Brooklyn, but I wonder if there's even a chance that Flexi hasn't read it already. I want to read Lorrie Moore's new book. "A Gate at the Stairs." Anyone read it?
  • Yep...Read Motherless... :-)

    Just finished "Netherland". Eh.

    Next up will likely be "The Hour I First Believed".
  • Flexi--I knew you read Motherless. Did you like it?
  • Flo wrote: Flexi--I knew you read Motherless. Did you like it?


    Yes.....from what I remember (ha...I read too much and pay attention to too little).
  • Read "Hour I First Believed" which was mostly good, but he pushes his anti-Bush agenda a bit too hard in a novel (and I am anti-Bush as well) and seemed to try to incorporate too many social issues into the story line.

    Reading "Shot Through the Heart" now (wasn't into it much, but it seems to be getting better).

    Bought "Beat the Reaper" today. It may be next up
  • Just finished Sing Them Home, liked it quite a bit, currently reading Hos, Hookers, Call Girls and Rentboys and it's awesome. Next up, A Gate at the Stairs by Lorrie Moore.
  • Almost done with Lucky Wander Boy by DB Weiss. Sort of in the same vein as The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Michael Chabon, though using early home-format video games (pong, pac-man, etc.) to build the story instead of the early comic book industry, as Chabon does.

    Recently finished Chabon's The Yiddish Policeman's Union, which I enjoyed thoroughly.

    Where the hell is that 5th George RR Martin book anyway? Its like 3 years overdue.
  • "A Home At The End Of The World" by Michael Cunningham.
    Better than "The Hours". Cunningham has such keen subtle understanding and observation...and as cute as whasshisface is in the movie, the book is galaxies better.

    in non-fiction, Garbageland by Brooklynite Elizabeth Royte
    :D
  • ntfool wrote: Recently finished Chabon's The Yiddish Policeman's Union, which I enjoyed thoroughly.


    This is the book I have been trying to find at my bookstore. Did you purchase it? Can you tell me what bookstore (PS I refuse to Amazon at this point and time for a personal reason).

    I am dying to read The Forgotten Garden but refused to pay full price for a book. Has anyone read it yet?

    PS - For all the teachers and educators out there - Borders is offering you 30% off any book with your id.
  • hey stacey -- you should ask unnameable books on vandy if they have it. if they don't they'll order it for you and give you 20% off. local business, and adam is a great guy.

    600 Vanderbilt Ave
    (between Dean St & St Marks Ave)
    Brooklyn, NY 11238
    (718) 789-1534
    unnameablebooks.net

    http://www.yelp.com/biz/unnameable-books-brooklyn-2
  • sweet tea wrote: hey stacey -- you should ask unnameable books on vandy if they have it. if they don't they'll order it for you and give you 20% off. local business, and adam is a great guy.

    600 Vanderbilt Ave
    (between Dean St & St Marks Ave)
    Brooklyn, NY 11238
    (718) 789-1534
    unnameablebooks.net

    http://www.yelp.com/biz/unnameable-books-brooklyn-2


    Thanks for the heads up, I didn't know they would order it. I have been dying to give my business to this place.
  • Two nine-inch hitchhiking thumbs up for Yiddish Police (very funny) & Garbageland (everything you wanted to know about Brooklyn garbage but were afraid to ask). Am reading the butterfly book (non-fiction) for the intriguing title alone-- "The Dangerous World of Butterflies: The Startling Subculture of Criminals, Collectors, and Conservationists". Ha.
  • just noticed that the address for unnameable (copied and pasted from yelp) is wrong. it's on vandy between st marks and prospect.
  • Flo wrote: "Beat the Reaper" by Josh Bazell entertained me recently. Kind of like ER meets The Sopranos. Its about a doctor in a witness protection program.


    I started reading this last night. So far, so good.

    Finished "Shot Through the Heart" by Mikal Gilmore - about his childhood and being the brother of Gary Gimore, who was executed for murder. Such a tragic life for the whole family.
  • Just finished Lisey's Story by Stephen King, he should stick to horror and that's coming from an insane King fan. I'm about to start The Swarm by Frank Schatzing or maybe Archenemy by Frank Beddor (I'm a huge Alice in Wonderland geek so I love these books).
  • I just finished Century Rain by Alistair Reynolds. Great Brit Sci Fi. This one wasn't part of his Revelation Space series (which was also awesome), but he creates an equally compelling world (worlds, actually) in this stand-alone.
  • Flexichick wrote: Finished "Shot Through the Heart" by Mikal Gilmore - about his childhood and being the brother of Gary Gimore, who was executed for murder. Such a tragic life for the whole family.


    how do i not know about this book? flexi, have you read the executioner's song? does mikal mention it at all? i've always been curious to hear what some of the people involved thought of it, but i've been too lazy to put any work into finding out.
  • ^I didn't read the executioner's song, but I saw the movie after I finished the book. I'd say that Mikal has mixed feelings about it......but one thing that he was very pleased with is that they let him listen to the tapes of the interviews that were done with Gary, the mom and others, and that gave Mikal a lot of information that he never had before. there were a ton of secrets and lies in that family
  • Flexichick wrote: [quote=Flo]"Beat the Reaper" by Josh Bazell entertained me recently. Kind of like ER meets The Sopranos. Its about a doctor in a witness protection program.


    I started reading this last night. So far, so good.


    Read that entire book two weekends ago nearly all at once (in fariness, was on vacation at my in-laws in south VA and prefer to spend many, many hours reading in solitude than talking to them, as they always drag the conversation into politics or religion). Was a good, fast-paced storyline but wasnt entirely thrilled with the abruptness of the ending.

    Also read online that DiCaprio's production company purchased the book rights for a potential starring roll for him. Eh.
  • am reading "Let the Great World Spin" by Colum McCann. So far, so good.

    DiCaprio also optioned "The Wolf of Wall Street" about Jordan Belfort and the Stratton Oakmont stockbroker scam. That should be interesting - a whole bunch of people I went to HS with got involved in the Stratton Oakmont shit and went to jail
  • Yup, reading Twilight. It's good so far. I just love picturing Robert Pattinson as Edward Cullen. :mrgreen:

    The book is a lot more detailed than the movie..

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  • I just started Cutting For Stone by Abraham Verghese and it's really good. Let The Great World Spin is next at bat.
  • Just read Singularity Sky by Charles Stross, who I think is awesome despite the fact that he looks like Danny Hellman. This is real high-concept Sci-Fi, and it's well-written too.

    Next, I'm moving on to Iron Sunrise.
  • Just finished Assassination Vacation and am about a quarter of the way through Wordy Shipmates, both by Sarah Vowell. If you are somewhat sarcastic, dorky, and enjoy a storytelling/informal fashion of history, you will like these books - oh yes, you will. Even better - they are both fairly quick reads!
  • Am reading "The Best American Magazine Writing 2009", which is chockfull, though I keep hearing print journalism is dead. Am a sucker for the Best of Series and other compilation-type books. Want to read "Cowboys Full, A History of Poker" by James McManus if I can get my hands on a copy.
  • I just finished "Invisible" by Paul Auster last night. He's a Brooklyn author, for those that don't know, but Brooklyn isn't featured in this book as he's featured it in some others. I'm not always a big fan of everything Auster writes, but I did enjoy this one.

    I started "The Tender Bar" last night. I can't remember the name of the author right now.

    I have a recommendation for "Daemon" by Daniel Suarez next. It's not really my genre, but I think I'll give it a try. Plus, it'll be the first thing I read on Current Wife's new Kindle, so I'm looking forward to see how I like that as well.
  • "i am not sidney poitier"
    was such a funny fast modern novel that I'm going for more Percival Everett...
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    http://www.veryshortlist.com/vsl/daily.cfm/review/1217/Book/i-am-not-sidney-poitier/
    :D
  • Just started Jonathan Lethem's (Motheress Brooklyn, Fortress of Solitude) newest, Chronic City, which is so far pretty good. Very tailored towards those of us who live in this wonderful city.