Crime Reporting, CompStat, and how many muggings are there? — Brooklynian

Crime Reporting, CompStat, and how many muggings are there?

We talk about crime alot on these boards. This is a thread to talk about crime reporting and statistics keeping, if anyone is interested. Do any of us have any way to track what is happening in our neighborhoods outside of our personal experiences and what we read?

Someone who lived in PH in the nineties was alarmed by what they were reading on the boards as they prepared to move back. Is crime up or down or . . . ?

http://www.nycpba.org/publications/mag-04-summer/compstat.html
This is an article The PBA Magazine talking about how the reporting system gives middle management in the NYPD a reason to suppress statistics so they don't get called out every week.
So how do you fake a crime decrease? It’s pretty simple. Don’t file reports, misclassify crimes from felonies to misdemeanors, under-value the property lost to crime so it’s not a felony, and report a series of crimes as a single event.

A particularly insidious way to fudge the numbers is to make it difficult or impossible for people to report crimes — in other words, make the victims feel like criminals so they walk away just to spare themselves further pain and suffering.
I don't know that the public has easy (or any) access to the CompStat numbers anyway. Anyone?

Comments

  • pitu, cant thank you enough.

    basic compstat info is here <http> for every nyc precinct. I wonder if theres any listing anywhere which is location-specific?
  • you can wonk through the published numbers by precinct here:
    http://www.ci.nyc.ny.us/html/nypd/html/crime_prevention/crime_statistics.shtml

    but there really is so much more to it . . .
    again, the "cooking the books" idea of underreporting etc
    here's an article from when the PBA was complaining a couple years ago
    http://zmagsite.zmag.org/Jun2004/treves0604.html

    I hope some of our law enforcement connected posters get interested in this discussion . . . :D
  • Hmm... maybe that's why the 114 precinct refused to deal with my being stalked as a crime. I thought it was just because they were sexist.

    Anyhoo, I was reading in the January 14, 2008 issue of New York magazine about how crime has dropped everywhere, but there are persistent spots in Brooklyn where crime, though dropping, is still stubbornly high. I really wish I could produce the link, but apparently, I would have to subscribe to do so, and I don't like the magazine enough to subscribe.

    But the article had several interesting points: The worst crime rate (measured as incidents per 100,000 people) is in Brownsville, Bed-Stuy, Bushwick (boy, I'm glad I didn't move there) and East New York.

    There was a color-coded map (damn I really wish I could produce the link!) which showed the crime rate in each neighborhood. There has been a LOT of discussion on the Crown Heights board about crime and how cops are like, "What do you expect? It's Crown Heights!" That characterization seems to be unfair. While crime is higher than in Park Slope, it's lower than in Ft. Greene and Brooklyn Heights! And basically, compared to the rest of Brooklyn, it's about average in crime rate. The only low-crime area in Brooklyn seems to be Borough Park. (And interestingly, there was no Prospect Heights on the map. It got subsumed into Crown Heights. I'm sure PH'ers are *thrilled* about that!)

    Still, though, if you are talking about, say, 800 incidents per 100,000 people (an incident being murder, rape, robbery or burglary), that still works out to about less than a 1% chance of being a victim of a major crime. Of course, ANY amount of crime is unacceptable, but I do believe in putting things in perspective rather than descending into hysteria. In Bed-Stuy, where the crime rate is TWICE Crown Heights' rate, the chances of being a victim of a major crime goes up to less than 2%.

    The theory from cops as to why crime stubbornly persists, is, you guessed it, drugs. But what we're seeing is NOT the drug turf wars of yore. While there still is Crips and Bloods graffitti being scrawled, if there is any affiliation, it's a very loose one. Drug gangs are not tightly organized like they were in the 90s. Sellers now mostly sell to people they know and sales are conducted indoors and away from the streets. What we're seeing is young men having guns because they are in the drug trade, getting into personal disputes, and then settling those personal disputes (often not drug-related) with guns because they happen to have one handy. It would seem that a push to remove illegal guns would make some headway here.

    Anyway, so while anyone can become a victim of a burglary, robbery or rape, so long as you are not involved in the drug trade or know anyone in the drug trade, the chances of you being a murder victim is really low. Stranger-on-stranger homicide has dropped precipitously all over the city.

    And this is of course, assuming that the numbers are fairly accurate. Even then, though, while I'm sure there is massaging of the crime numbers (my home town did this all the time, so this doesn't shock me) I doubt that they would or could discount the majority of crimes reported. Thus we can still talk about overall trends as far as which neighborhood is safer.
  • does anyone know if there was talk of activity along Underhill at the Precinct Meeting last night? Sound like Operation Impact has more pressing matters.. but was there any other word?
  • I think it's not a matter of Operation Impact having more pressing issues, but rather where it is that they've been stationed. The impact zone covers a relatively small sliver of the precinct, which doesn't include Underhill. It might be worth a try to get a group from that area to attend the next meeting or even just show up at the precinct as concerned citizens with questions. In general, it's a huge precinct and they always seem to be strapped for people. However, now that at least part of it is covered by O.I., it might be a good time to press for extra patrol cars in the area from the 77 itself. From what I've read on these boards, it sounds like police response was decisive and swift, which is good. Maybe having the impact officers in place allowed that to happen.
  • I gather that the placing of the impact officers was in response to the large number of shootings along the Franklin and Nostrand corridors from mid-2007 to the end of the year. As the incidents on Underhill are recent, it may take some time for them to coordinate a response to the changes in crime in the area.
  • lilbangladesh wrote: I was reading in the January 14, 2008 issue of New York magazine about how crime has dropped everywhere, but there are persistent spots in Brooklyn where crime, though dropping, is still stubbornly high. I really wish I could produce the link, but apparently, I would have to subscribe to do so, and I don't like the magazine enough to subscribe.
    Here is the map: http://media.nymag.com/docs/08/01/080114crimemaps.pdf
  • Thank you! I would have been able to call it up, I suspect, if I had the actual title of the article at hand, but it was my boss' copy.
  • That map is great -- it also made me recall another interesting crime-related map that the NY Times came out with a couple years ago -- it relates only to murders from 2003-05, but I was impressed with the level of details.

    http://www.nytimes.com/packages/html/nyregion/20060428_HOMICIDE_MAP.html
  • Hi Folks!

    I haven't posted here in quite a while. Just dropped by to wish everyone a fabulous, though belated, Happy New Year.

    Sorry to see that the crime problems in East New York are still quite bad. But maybe a miracle will happen there some day.


    Keep smiling Brooklyn! I still love ya!

    :D :D :D :D :D :D :D
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